Aug 18,19,20 tickets

Monthly Archives: February 2013

Georgian Bay roots Ep 44

Georgian Bay Roots

With your host Jon Farmer


1609969_10154532318180220_5111923560966166563_nEvery Sunday on CFOS 560 from 4-5pm, Georgian Bay Roots shares some of the best music that’s made in and played in Grey and Bruce Counties with roots music from across Canada and around the world thrown into the mix. Host, Jon Farmer, brings a musician’s ear and the heart of a fan to the airwaves with stories about performers and news about upcoming shows and releases. Tune in to hear some of your favourite acts and new bands that you didn’t know you loved.

On this week’s episode we showcase artists performing at this years Harbour Nights concert series in Owen Sound, give a quick tour of Summerfolk veterans who were at Mariposa this year, and share tracks from performers coming up at Summerfolk42.

If you missed the live show, we will post the episode by 6pm ET.

You can download an iTunes podcast here

Are you making music that you want us to share?
Do you have gig coming up that you want to promote?
Are you interested in being a sponsor or advertising on the show?
Contact us at georgianbayroots@summerfolk.org

Georgian Bay Roots is presented by the Georgian Bay Folk Society with the support of the Ontario Trillium Foundation

Georgian Bay Roots is sponsored this week by:

casero photo 1
OS_Transportation_FeaturedImage

 owen-sound

Play List Coming Soon

Archives

Visit our  iTunes podcast page for archived programs

Pages with set lists and further info can be found below.

GBR show 1

GBR show 2

GBR show 3

GBR show 4

GBR show 5

GBR show 6

GBR show 7

GBR show 8

GBR show 9

GBR show 10

GBR show 11

GBR show 12

GBR show 13

GBR show 14

GBR show 15

GBR show 16

GBR show 17

GBR show 18

GBR show 19

GBR show 20 – Valentine’s Day

GBR show 21

GBR show 22

GBR show 23

GBR show 24

GBR show 25

GBR show 26

GBR show 27

GBR show 28

GBR show 29 – Easter

GBR show 30

GBR show 31

GBR show 32

GBR show 33 – Mother’s Day

GBR show 34

GBR show 35

GBR show 36

GBR show 37

GBR show 38

GBR show 39

GBR show 40 – Canada Day

GBR show 41

GBR show 42

GBR show 43

Family Ties

Several years ago, I was teaching at a music camp in New Jersey. I had a group of about 16 songwriters as students. On the first night they invited me down to a songwriters’ circle at one of the cabins. I went, stayed for one round through the circle, and said my “good nights”. I then went and played for two hours with the contra dance band.

 

The next day, they asked what I thought about the circle. My inner Canadian was still asleep and instead of being polite, I said what was on my mind. I told them that the best thing they could do as songwriters was to go back home and find a traditional band to play with —traditional Irish, traditional Rock and Roll, it didn’t matter. They were writing songs that had no tie to any tradition, except a singer songwriter tradition. To write better songs, they had to grow some roots. Case in point-Joel Plaskett.

 

Joel is a node. He’s one of these people who works well with others. He has written the occasional song with Matt Andersen. He has production credits on dozens of CDs. He’s recorded and performed with Rose Cousins and Anne Egge. He’s played everything from orchestral shows to Cafes. He clearly likes to play. He likes to explore and bring people along for the ride.

 

Joel has spent most of his career in bands-Nabisco Fonzie, The Thrush Hermits, Neuseiland and his eponymous Joel Plaskett Emergency. He’s a great live performer, relaxed and comfortable. His melodies are catchy. Though he has dabbled in a lot of styles musically, his lyrics maintain a consistent conversational tone. There’s a lot of storytelling. Joel has enjoyed and is enjoying the kind of success that independent artists aspire to. Great sales, sold out concerts, nominations and awards are all fruits of hard work and talent.

 

This year, though, it’s back to the roots for Joel. He joins forces with one of his earliest musical influences—his father Bill Plaskett.

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joelandbillBill was born in London, England in 1945. He spent the early 1960s playing tenor banjo —learned from his father— and bass in a traditional jazz bands and skiffle groups. In 1966, Bill traveled through the United States on a Greyhound bus pass. He immigrated to Canada in 1967, ultimately moving to Nova Scotia where Joel was born in 1975.

 

Through much of the 1980s the family lived in historic Lunenburg. The town is the embodiment, in wood and stone, of what every Canadian imagines Nova Scotia to be. Trim wooden houses rise up from the harbour. It looks prosperous because it was. The Bluenose is the most famous of the vessels that was built in that harbour, but she was only one of thousands born in Lunenburg’s cradles. In the mid 1800s, there could be as many as 18 vessels under construction at a time. There may be busloads of tourists now posing before the picturesque, but it’s still a working harbour.

 

Bill played in an old time band called Starb’ard Side and helped found the beloved Lunenburg Folk Festival. On festival weekend the town is dominated by the tent atop Blockhouse Hill, the highest point in town. Music also happens on the docks on the waterfront.

 

From the beginning, the festival was plagued by a lack of accommodation for the musicians. Volunteers and members of the board offered their houses as billets. Kitchen parties at the Plaskett house during the festival were a big event, but there was live music in the house all year round. Joel did not learn to be a musician in isolation, it was part of the fabric of his youth— Bill made sure of that.

 

They have recorded a new CD, Solidarity and have been touring throughout the spring and summer. The CD gives a glimpse of their musical life. In typical Joel fashion, the supporting cast draws from sources as divergent as Mayhemingways, a duo from Peterborough who will be the backing band for Bill and Joel’s Summerfolk appearance, to Shannon Quinn a wicked traditional fiddler. The album is stripped sown and simple. As its title suggests, the disc doesn’t shy away from politics, that’s in the finest folk tradition.

 

 

Bill and Joel Plaskett join us at Summerfolk 42 on August 18th on our Amphitheatre stage. Summerfolk runs August 17, 18, 19, 20 at Kelso beach park in Owen Sound, Ontario. In formation can be found at summerfolk.org or by phoning our office at 519-371-2991. Weekend passes are available at advance prices until July 31.

Bringing the world to the OS

Musically, I was raised on a strange brew. My Da, Irish by birth, loved traditional Irish music. The Clancy Brothers were the high priests of his musical church. Any deviation from the canon was met with the hairy eyeball and a thunderous silence. My Mum, an East Ender from Stepney, was a devotee of West End musicals. In the days before personal musical devices, there was often a tussle at the record player and a lot of good-natured ribbing at the other’s musical choices.

 

I was the middle child, so I learned to sing Roddy McCorley and also appeared as von Trapp in the high school version of the Sound of Music. I was keeping the peace.

 

At nineteen, I strapped on a backpack and with a summer’s worth of wages from working sheet metal, I headed for Europe. I returned a changed musical man. To Da’s horror, I arrived with a ton of Irish music not sung by beefy guys in Aran sweaters. There was incredulity from my Mum at what had happened to the West End. What the devil was Che Guevara doing in a musical?

 

I love traditional music in its pure form, but I also love when it steps outside the box. We have a couple of acts at this year’s Summerfolk that certainly do that.

 

Estonia is one of a number of Eastern European countries experiencing a folk revival. Some bands are taking the Estonian tradition to new places. Trad.Attack! is one of those bands.7. EP cover photo 2014 (Mait Jüriado)

At the heart of the trio, are the piping of Sandra Vabarna and the singing tradition of Jalmar Vabarna’s family. His great-grandmother, Anne Vabarna, was one of the most famous Estonian folk singers — he grew up immersed in the tradition.

 

Sandra has been playing pipes since she was thirteen. The Estonian pipes have the drive of the highland pipes combined with the sweetness and reediness of the Northumbrian variety. She also plays flute, jaw harp and adds mouth music into the mix.

 

Tõnu Tubli rounds out the trio. His father was the conductor of a brass orchestra, and Tõnu was playing brass before he could walk. He settled on classical trombone also adding drums and percussion to his bag of tricks. Tubli is one of the most in-demand drummers in Estonia.

 

Many of their songs build upon loops created from archival recordings of Estonian folk singers. Sandra might add a jaw harp riff before exhorting the audience to sing along. Jalmar is a master of the twelve-string guitar with a sound like Shawn Phillips or Richie Havens — driving rhythms with that textured twelve-string jangle. There’s a lot of power behind their sound. They are going to turn quite a few heads at Summerfolk

 

But you can never be sure…

 

I have some friends who are not folk music fans. I keep trying to win them over. Sometimes I succeed, sometimes I don’t. My friend, Oliver, is a hard nut to crack. “Festivals — not my thing,” he would say.

 

I finally got him to come up to Summerfolk40. Oliver arrived late-ish on the Saturday evening and caught the last half of the last act on the Amphitheatre stage. Wanting a tour of the site, I obliged and we ended up at the Down by the Bay tent just as Delhi 2 Dublin was cranking it up. We went up to the monitor position on stage right so he could get a good look. After a minute or two, I turned around to see his reaction — he wasn’t there. Oliver was right in the middle of the dance pit at the front of the stage! Mission accomplished. Delhi 2 Dublin was my not-too-secret weapon.

 

I would hire Delhi 2 Dublin every year if I could. Even to an inveterate non-dancer like me, they are irresistible. They serve up a mix of South Asian sounds, club beats and Celtic tunes. The band started as a live collaboration for the CelticFest Vancouver in 2006, a performance piece called Delhi to Dublin. The audience reaction was so overwhelming that it led to the formation of the band as a permanent entity. The band members have changed over the years but, at the core, they remain true to the spirit of their birth.

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They manage to connect roots music to the future. Delhi 2 Dublin features a heavy, electronic backbone with live, traditional, Indian instruments and more. Ravi Binning plays dhol and dholak, the large and small versions of the two-headed drum ubiquitous to the Indian subcontinent. Tarun Nayar plays tabla, the distinctive percussive and the melodic heart of Indian classical and popular music. He also handles the electronics and the beats. Serena Eades on violin provides the Celtic splash. Topping it all off, are the stunning, punjabi-english vocals of frontman, Sanjay Seran. If they don’t have you moving, I’ll eat my hat.

 

 

Summerfolk42 is going to get you outside your box August 17, 18, 19 and 20 at Kelso Beach Park in Owen Sound. Information can be found at summerfolk.org or by phoning 519-371-2995

Georgian Bay Roots Ep 43

Georgian Bay Roots

With your host Jon Farmer


1609969_10154532318180220_5111923560966166563_nEvery Sunday on CFOS 560 from 4-5pm, Georgian Bay Roots shares some of the best music that’s made in and played in Grey and Bruce Counties with roots music from across Canada and around the world thrown into the mix. Host, Jon Farmer, brings a musician’s ear and the heart of a fan to the airwaves with stories about performers and news about upcoming shows and releases. Tune in to hear some of your favourite acts and new bands that you didn’t know you loved.

This show starts with performers who will be at Summerfolk42, plays a bunch of fireflies songs, and ends with some folks Jon met at Mariposa and a shout out to Owen Sound’s Harbour Nights concerts.

If you missed the live show, we will post the episode by 6pm ET.

You can download an iTunes podcast here

Are you making music that you want us to share?
Do you have gig coming up that you want to promote?
Are you interested in being a sponsor or advertising on the show?
Contact us at georgianbayroots@summerfolk.org

 

Georgian Bay Roots is presented by the Georgian Bay Folk Society with the support of the Ontario Trillium Foundation

Georgian Bay Roots is sponsored this week by:

casero photo 1
OS_Transportation_FeaturedImage

 owen-sound

Play List Coming Soon

Archives

Visit our  iTunes podcast page for archived programs

Pages with set lists and further info can be found below.

GBR show 1

GBR show 2

GBR show 3

GBR show 4

GBR show 5

GBR show 6

GBR show 7

GBR show 8

GBR show 9

GBR show 10

GBR show 11

GBR show 12

GBR show 13

GBR show 14

GBR show 15

GBR show 16

GBR show 17

GBR show 18

GBR show 19

GBR show 20 – Valentine’s Day

GBR show 21

GBR show 22

GBR show 23

GBR show 24

GBR show 25

GBR show 26

GBR show 27

GBR show 28

GBR show 29 – Easter

GBR show 30

GBR show 31

GBR show 32

GBR show 33 – Mother’s Day

GBR show 34

GBR show 35

GBR show 36

GBR show 37

GBR show 38

GBR show 39

GBR show 40 – Canada Day

GBR show 41

GBR show 42

Georgian Bay Roots Ep 42

Georgian Bay Roots

With your host Jon Farmer


1609969_10154532318180220_5111923560966166563_nEvery Sunday on CFOS 560 from 4-5pm, Georgian Bay Roots shares some of the best music that’s made in and played in Grey and Bruce Counties with roots music from across Canada and around the world thrown into the mix. Host, Jon Farmer, brings a musician’s ear and the heart of a fan to the airwaves with stories about performers and news about upcoming shows and releases. Tune in to hear some of your favourite acts and new bands that you didn’t know you loved.

This show starts with a trad set, features musicians playing as part of next week’s Month of Sundays show, and showcases performers who will be at Summerfolk42.

If you missed the live show, we will post the episode by 6pm ET.

You can download an iTunes podcast here

Are you making music that you want us to share?
Do you have gig coming up that you want to promote?
Are you interested in being a sponsor or advertising on the show?
Contact us at georgianbayroots@summerfolk.org

Georgian Bay Roots is presented by the Georgian Bay Folk Society with the support of the Ontario Trillium Foundation

Georgian Bay Roots is sponsored this week by:

casero photo 1
OS_Transportation_FeaturedImage

 owen-sound

Play List Coming Soon

Archives

Visit our  iTunes podcast page for archived programs

Pages with set lists and further info can be found below.

GBR show 1

GBR show 2

GBR show 3

GBR show 4

GBR show 5

GBR show 6

GBR show 7

GBR show 8

GBR show 9

GBR show 10

GBR show 11

GBR show 12

GBR show 13

GBR show 14

GBR show 15

GBR show 16

GBR show 17

GBR show 18

GBR show 19

GBR show 20 – Valentine’s Day

GBR show 21

GBR show 22

GBR show 23

GBR show 24

GBR show 25

GBR show 26

GBR show 27

GBR show 28

GBR show 29 – Easter

GBR show 30

GBR show 31

GBR show 32

GBR show 33 – Mother’s Day

GBR show 34

GBR show 35

GBR show 36

GBR show 37

GBR show 38

GBR show 39

GBR show 40 – Canada Day

GBR show 41

On the Road Survival with Samantha Martin

Travel can be exhausting and for touring musicians everyday travel struggles come with the added pressure to perform at your best every time you take to the stage. Five Time Maple Blues Award Nominee and Grey Bruce musical export Samantha Martin will return to Owen Sound on July 16th to share the tips and strategies that touring musicians use to keep themselves at the top of their game while on tour. The workshop is the seventh in Summerfolk’s Music Biz Tune Up workshop series helping local performers develop the business skills they’ll need to make the most of their musical careers.

Sam MartinSamantha Martin has deep family roots on the Bruce Peninsula and she spent a formative musical period in Owen Sound. Now, she fronts an in-demand band (Samantha Martin and Delta Sugar) and tours from coast, to coast, to coast in Canada as well as in Europe and the USA. With so much time on the road, Samantha has built up an arsenal of tricks to stay healthy and happy. “The more planning ahead of time you do – means when the unexpected happens (and it always does) you are in a position problem solve with the least amount of stress”, she said. The interactive workshop will allow participants to ask questions and learn from Samantha’s stories first hand.

Summerfolk is presenting Music Biz Tune Up workshops every month to help local musicians of all genres develop the business skills they need without having to leave the area to develop. The On the Road Survival workshop will run from 1-3pm at the SuiteSpots building at 1051 2nd Ave East, Owen Sound. Participants can register online at Summerfolk.org/musicbiztuneup or at the door on the day of the workshop. Registration is $20.

Georgian Bay Roots Ep 41

Georgian Bay Roots

With your host Jon Farmer


1609969_10154532318180220_5111923560966166563_nEvery Sunday on CFOS 560 from 4-5pm, Georgian Bay Roots shares some of the best music that’s made in and played in Grey and Bruce Counties with roots music from across Canada and around the world thrown into the mix. Host, Jon Farmer, brings a musician’s ear and the heart of a fan to the airwaves with stories about performers and news about upcoming shows and releases. Tune in to hear some of your favourite acts and new bands that you didn’t know you loved.

This show focuses on summer songs, songs about enough, and features some tracks by folks who make and sell guitars with some concert news and a catchy jingle mixed in there too.

If you missed the live show, we will post the episode by 6pm ET.

You can download an iTunes podcast here

Are you making music that you want us to share?
Do you have gig coming up that you want to promote?
Are you interested in being a sponsor or advertising on the show?
Contact us at georgianbayroots@summerfolk.org

Georgian Bay Roots is presented by the Georgian Bay Folk Society with the support the Ontario Trillium Foundation

Georgian Bay Roots is sponsored this week by:

casero photo 1
OS_Transportation_FeaturedImage

 owen-sound

Play List Coming Soon

Archives

Visit our  iTunes podcast page for archived programs

Pages with set lists and further info can be found below.

GBR show 1

GBR show 2

GBR show 3

GBR show 4

GBR show 5

GBR show 6

GBR show 7

GBR show 8

GBR show 9

GBR show 10

GBR show 11

GBR show 12

GBR show 13

GBR show 14

GBR show 15

GBR show 16

GBR show 17

GBR show 18

GBR show 19

GBR show 20 – Valentine’s Day

GBR show 21

GBR show 22

GBR show 23

GBR show 24

GBR show 25

GBR show 26

GBR show 27

GBR show 28

GBR show 29 – Easter

GBR show 30

GBR show 31

GBR show 32

GBR show 33 – Mother’s Day

GBR show 34

GBR show 35

GBR show 36

GBR show 37

GBR show 38

GBR show 39

GBR show 40 – Canada Day

SUMMERFOLK_JHarman-210

Those magic moments

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I could fill a book with the magical moments I’ve had at festivals. As a performer, I had the opportunity to sit in with some of my musical heroes in workshops and sessions with the chance to sit on stage with them and get a close look at what they do. If things were really comfortable, I got to play a tune with them.

As an audience member, I have seen spur of the moment collaborations on workshop stages that have electrified me. I’ve felt the thrill of knowing that what I saw on stage would never happen again quite the same way. It defies audio recording and video recording.

Obviously, that synergy comes about by having the right mix of artists at the festival. So, how do you book and program a festival?As the artistic director, there is a lot that has to happen before magic touches an audience.

We open performer applications in early October and close them in February, receiving between three and four hundred for the festival. I have to look further than the outright applications, though. I also choose from artists that are touring in August, as well as those I want to bring in because I think our patrons will enjoy them. Selections continue with audience favourites, suggestions from social media and a dozen or so wish lists that people give me

I have about 40 slots to fill and from that I have to have some bands that can play formal dance sets — contra, step dancing and square dancing, for example. I need some singer-songwriters, some late night dance bands and some traditional acts. I need good storytellers and masterful instrumentalists.

Also needed are some performers with broad name recognition and most important, some bands that you’ve never heard of. One thing that Summerfolk audiences love above all else is making a discovery.

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I end up with a working list that I have made for myself to guide the booking. If I were to show you the list I started with and the final roster you’d see quite a difference.

I present offers to artists and they accept, reject or negotiate them. Of course, some artists say yes right away. There can be any number of reasons why a performer doesn’t accept an offer. The weekend may be booked already. The offer might not meet expectations. Some time may be needed to see if other work can be found around the Summerfolk weekend — a big consideration if a band is coming from a great distance.

We aim to have the roster completed by the end of March. By that time, we have collected high-resolution photos of the artists, bios and video links needed for publicity. We start getting the bands’ technical riders for the technical director who begins mapping out what we need for sound, stage, and lights.

 

Once I have every performer confirmed and can account for their travel times, I start scheduling the festival. There are forty acts and almost all of them will get their own concert slot.

There are eighteen time slots available on the Amphitheatre stage and fourteen in the evening in the Down by the Bay tent. There are roughly sixty slots to fill on the six daytime stages.

There are workshops that are no-brainers. You have to have a blues jam. Songs from a Hat has become a staple. If there are enough Celtic bands for a ceilidh, you’d best have one. There should be a workshop geared to children.

We ask for suggestions from the performers. How else would I have known that Matt Epp does some songs in Turkish or that Mayhemingways have a dancing chicken puppet? We also have the band lists—handy if you want to do a workshop that might involve a specialty instrument.

But above all, I look for combinations of personalities that might work well together. In looking over the lists, are there performers who have already played together or appeared at several festivals together this summer? I look for performers from the same town or from the same region thinking they might already have some common repertoire.

I’m taking those things and a hundred others into consideration when filling the schedule. Even if I have done all that right, it still needs one more essential element — a great audience.

Performers are not going to go out on limb in an unrehearsed jam unless they feel comfortable. The audiences at Summerfolk make the performers comfortable. They are willing to walk out on the tightrope with the performer. Almost all the people who have played the festival have remarked on how extraordinary the Summerfolk audience is — attentive, interactive and supportive.

The forty-second edition of Summerfolk happens August 17, 18, 19, 20 at Kelso Beach Park in Owen Sound. Schedules will be appearing on the website later next week. Information can be found at summerfolk.org or by phoning 519-371-2995.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ShakuraSAida_Promo6

Trying on Pants

Shawn Hall of The Harpoonist and the Axe Murderer has provided me with my mantra for the next year. In an interview with Mike Usinger of the Georgia Straight, Hall mentioned that on the road to self discovery “… What it comes down to is—you’ve got to try on a lot of pants.”

I’ve been trying to tell people that for years, but never so simply.

It’s not surprising though—simplicity is the driving force that makes the music of The Harpoonist and the Axe Murderer such a spine tingling pleasure. For two guys—Shawn is the Harpoonist, Matthew Rogers is the other guy—they produce a mighty sound.
Hall and Rogers are from the lower mainland. They met, like most acts do, in their twenties. A chance bit of session work introduced Shawn to Matt. The session work—they recorded a jingle for a local Jerk restaurant—lead to the creation of the duo in 2007. They released their debut disk, The Blues Can Kill, the same year. They were enthusiastically embraced by the west coast scene. The halls kept filling up and they kept touring further afield.

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They pump out  dark, brooding, danceable blues-based songs.They tend to the raw, low down, gritty end of the scale. With a name like The Harpoonist and the Axe Murderer that’s to be expected. Their new cd, Apocalipstick, deals with some dark subjects but it’s done with a bit of a grin—a dark sense of humour. The lyrics are sharp and precise and Hall’s crunchy harmonica sounds and Rogers gritty guitar chops whip up a rhythm storm.

They have moved past the duo now, adding back ground vocalists—they will be joined by Alexa Dirks who was last at Summerfolk as part of Chic Gamine-percussion and keyboards, but the music retains its simplicity. It always comes back to the groove for them, and for their audience.

Like Hall and Rogers, Shakura S’aida had to try on a lot of pants.
She simmered on the edge of the music scene for a quite a while trying out a lot of different styles. She fronted a world music act— Kaleefah— and was a backing vocalist to artists as diverse as Rita MacNeil and Patti Labelle. Her heart , it turns out, was really in the blues.

In 2008 she placed high in the running at the International Blues Challenge in Memphis. She also released her first solo cd, Blueprint. Maple Blues and Juno nominations followed. She’s not the edge of the scene any longer. She is the scene. She’s got a rich layered voice, a knack for writing and interpretation and a great choice in players.

I’d heard Shakura’s name a lot, but hadn’t seen her perform. Then, two years ago I was asked to take part in a songwriter’s circle for the Canadian Songwriter’s Association. Shakura was going to be one of the 4 performers.  A beautiful room in Koerner Hall and a sold out crowd of enthusiastic listeners—what could be better.

Whenever I play a songwriter circle I treat it like a festival workshop-a round robin where it’s important to listen to what is played before you. Have you got a song on the same theme? Do you have a song that compliments the one just played? If you can think of what the audience is experiencing rather than an interior agenda, the whole thing can lift off.

Shakura and her guitar player were on my right, so as we went round the circle, she was playing after me each round.
I found out that Shakura is an ears-wide-open musician. She listens intensely. She pulls thread from the song you’ve sung and with a twist, and a bit of wit, she spins that thread into her song. She was awesome and a natural at the art of the workshop.

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I got to know Shakura  better a couple of months later when she asked me to co-write a song with her for a United Way project in Toronto. She was easy to co-write with because she is comfortable in her own skin, and makes you feel the same. It comes partly from the multinational nature of her life. Born in Brooklyn, raised in Switzerland, now making home in Toronto, she’s had to be able to break down barriers.

The night we performed the song, it wasn’t just her and a guitar player. It was an 8 piece band, including a horn section. She rocked the room. Having seen her in an intimate setting and at full throttle, I was sure that she would fit in at Summerfolk.

Shakura S’Aida and the Harpoonist and the Axe Murderer will meet on stage with the legendary Trevor MacKenzie at our celebrated Saturday afternoon Blues by Bay session—Saturday, August 19 at 4PM-ish. Information can be had at summerfolk.org or by phoning or office at 519-371-2995. Summerfolk happens August 17, 18, 19, 20, at Kelso Beach Park.

Georgian Bay Roots Ep 40 – Canada Day

Georgian Bay Roots

With your host Jon Farmer


1609969_10154532318180220_5111923560966166563_nEvery Sunday on CFOS 560 from 4-5pm, Georgian Bay Roots shares some of the best music that’s made in and played in Grey and Bruce Counties with roots music from across Canada and around the world thrown into the mix. Host, Jon Farmer, brings a musician’s ear and the heart of a fan to the airwaves with stories about performers and news about upcoming shows and releases. Tune in to hear some of your favourite acts and new bands that you didn’t know you loved.

This is the slightly belated Canada Day Episode of Georgian Bay Roots with songs about our country’s past and present. It’s good for some thoughtful commentary, stunning songs, and a few chuckles too.

If you missed the live show, we will post the episode by 6pm ET.

You can download an iTunes podcast here

Are you making music that you want us to share?
Do you have gig coming up that you want to promote?
Are you interested in being a sponsor or advertising on the show?
Contact us at georgianbayroots@summerfolk.org

Georgian Bay Roots is presented by the Georgian Bay Folk Society with the support the Ontario Trillium Foundation

 

Georgian Bay Roots is sponsored this week by:

casero photo 1
OS_Transportation_FeaturedImage 

Maawanjiiding

 

Play List Coming Soon

 

Archives

Visit our  iTunes podcast page for archived programs

Pages with set lists and further info can be found below.

GBR show 1

GBR show 2

GBR show 3

GBR show 4

GBR show 5

GBR show 6

GBR show 7

GBR show 8

GBR show 9

GBR show 10

GBR show 11

GBR show 12

GBR show 13

GBR show 14

GBR show 15

GBR show 16

GBR show 17

GBR show 18

GBR show 19

GBR show 20 – Valentine’s Day

GBR show 21

GBR show 22

GBR show 23

GBR show 24

GBR show 25

GBR show 26

GBR show 27

GBR show 28

GBR show 29 – Easter

GBR show 30

GBR show 31

GBR show 32

GBR show 33 – Mother’s Day

GBR show 34

GBR show 35

GBR show 36

GBR show 37

Underneath any great festival are great sponsors.
  • OTF.
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