Aug 17,18,19 tickets

Monthly Archives: February 2013

Georgian Bay Roots Episode 94 – Kelly Joins the Team!

Georgian Bay Roots

With your hosts Lauren, Jon, Kailey, and Kelly

16903583_10154215696451937_4199917910502370392_oEvery Sunday on CFOS 560 from 4-5pm, Georgian Bay Roots shares some of the best music that’s made in and played in Grey and Bruce Counties with roots music from across Canada and around the world thrown into the mix.

This week’s host, Kelly Babcock is a writer, performer, open mic host, and local music fan. His family roots are deep in Kemble and his love of music is bottomless.

This is Kelly’s first show where he plays songs he loves from local artists and from artists who have played locally. Welcome him to the airwaves.


You can download an iTunes podcast here

Special thanks to the Owen Sound Transportation Company  for sponsoring part of the show this week:
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Are you making music that you want us to share?
Do you have gig coming up that you want to promote?
Are you interested in being a sponsor or advertising on the show?
Contact us at georgianbayroots@summerfolk.org

Archives

Visit our  iTunes podcast page for archived programs

Georgian Bay Roots Episode 93 – Summertime/Mariposa with Kailey

Georgian Bay Roots

With your hosts Lauren, Jon, Kailey, and Kelly

Every Sunday on CFOS 560 from 4-5pm, Georgian Bay Roots shares some of the best music that’s made in and played in Grey and Bruce Counties with roots music from across Canada and around the world thrown into the mix.

This week’s host, Kailey Jane Hawkins is an aspiring singer songwriter with a love for all things music. As Grey Bruce is home to such a rich community of artists, she’s excited to be part of the Georgian Bay Roots Radio team to help share that richness with the world

It’s the summertime and the living is easy. It’s also the Mariposa Folk Festival show! Featuring music by Sarah Harmer, Irish Mythen, Cécile Doo-Kingué, Abigail Lapell, Ariko, Suzie Vinnick, Samantha Martin, Danny Michel, The Lifers, Rose Cousins, Walk Off The Earth, Great Big Sea, Pete Seeger, and Kelly Babcock!

You can download an iTunes podcast here

Special thanks to the Owen Sound Transportation Company and Mariposa for sponsoring part of the show this week:
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Are you making music that you want us to share?
Do you have gig coming up that you want to promote?
Are you interested in being a sponsor or advertising on the show?
Contact us at georgianbayroots@summerfolk.org

Archives

Visit our  iTunes podcast page for archived programs

Accessibility

ACCESSIBILITY @ SUMMERFOLK FESTIVAL – JUST ASK

Summerfolk makes its best efforts to ensure the festival is as accessible as possible to people with special needs. Our complete Persons with Disabilities Customer Service Policy and related forms are available for download.

Stop by our ASK (Access Support Krew)Tent for assistance, a place to rest, or to get information on accessibility, including the best pathways to stages, vendors, workshop sites, washroom facilities, as well as medical suppliers.

Large-print and Braille schedules are also available at the ASK Tent.

REGISTRATION

Summerfolk is committed to offering exceptional service to its patrons by providing an environment that is inclusive, accessible, and respects the dignity and independence of people with disabilities. In order to help us maintain these standards, please advise the Summerfolk Festival Office Staff by calling us at 519-371-2995 prior to your visit if you are a person with a disability who requires assistance to participate in the festival, or in the event of an emergency evacuation.

ACCESSIBLE PARKING

Due to limited availability, only those patrons with an official Accessible Parking Permit recognized by the Ontario Ministry of Transportation will be able to park in the accessible parking area.

Fifteen (15) accessible parking spots are available at the front gate. If all of the designated accessible parking spots are occupied when you arrive, our parking volunteers will help you find a suitable parking alternative.

SERVICE ANIMALS

As part of Summerfolk’s commitment to respectfully accommodate our patrons with disabilities, registered service animals are welcome to attend the festival, as well as our offices, with those who require them.

Please note that all service animals will receive a band to be worn on their collar. This will allow Summerfolk volunteers to identify legitimate service animals on the festival grounds.

It is important for service dogs to be identifiable to other patrons as well, as many people have animal allergies, and the festival advertises and upholds a no dog policy. The owner of any dog on the festival site not wearing a band issued by the festival will be directed to the Administration Trailer to verify their legitimacy as a service animal.

COMPANIONS & PERSONAL SUPPORT WORKERS

Summerfolk welcomes Companions and Personal Support Workers who are providing assistance to patrons with special needs at the festival. At no time will a person with a disability be knowingly prevented from having access to personal support while on the festival premises. A support person can be a paid professional, volunteer, family member or a friend. Recognized Companions and Personal Support Workers are admitted to the festival 50% free of the admissions fee.

Children under 12 are admitted free. If they have a disability, their Personal Support Worker is also admitted to the festival free of charge.
ACCESSIBLE TOILETS

There are accessible ‘port-a-potties’ in each bank of washrooms located throughout the festival site. If they do not meet your needs, there are public accessible washroom near the children’s area/by Gazebo Tent and at the beach.

SEATING AREAS

Accessible seating areas will be located and clearly marked wherever possible. Accessible seating is available at the:

  • Amphitheatre Stage

For patrons and their companions wishing to enter the Amphitheatre area, please advise the volunteers located at the entrance to the venue. Should you wish, they will have the ASK Team guide you to an accessible entrance and seating area.
ACCESSIBLE TRAILS

Paved pathways surround the perimeter of the festival venue, including along the water’s edge. Most of the pathways within the park are packed dirt, and are also accessible. Cable mats provide easy passage for wheels, both small and large.

FEEDBACK PROCESS

To help us ensure outstanding customer service for people with disabilities, we encourage your comments and feedback, whether positive or negative. Festival patrons who wish to comment on the way we serve and accommodate people with disabilities are encouraged to provide feedback in person at the ASK Tent, by telephone at 519-371-2995 or email gbfs@bmts.com

All feedback including complaints will be handled by the Georgian Bay Folk Society President. Customers can expect to hear back within ten (10) business days.

For the GBFS Persons with Disabilities Customer Service Policy at this link:   https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BxX_NSTe_BypTmRFbkxhei1BYjA/view

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Sun Times Article 7: Discovering musical beginnings

Every year Artistic Director James Keelaghan writes a series of 12 articles for the Owen Sound Sun Times previewing the Summerfolk Music and Crafts Festival

Gigs make a difference. I can’t repeat that enough.

The only way a musician becomes a better musician is by playing. The only way a musician becomes a better performer is by performing. Regular gigs paid my way through university. Granted, I was living in a 300 square foot house with no central heating, but between the music and some other part time work, I made my way. The club gigs were about learning––learning enough repertoire to fill an evening and how to plan a set of music.

 

Playing a festival gig teaches a whole different set of skills—how to play to a larger audience, how to pace a set that is 40 minutes rather than 60 minutes long and how to gracefully share the stage with other performers.

 

Festivals are also about forming relationships that are fundamental to growth as a musician. A couple of articles ago, I mentioned how Stephen Fearing and I met at the Jasper Folk Festival and how important we were to one another in the early days. Those kinds of relationships are forged at festivals. A band finds itself in a workshop with another band and discovers that they have a common vocabulary. Offstage, they share experiences, learning that music truly is a community––not something that only happens in isolation.

 

The Youth Discoveries Program is one of Summerfolk’s oldest initiatives. It’s been running for over ten years, an ever-evolving program that gives young performers a festival experience. It grew out of the hard work of former Artistic Director, Richard Knechtel, and long time volunteer, Jerry Walsh. They felt that young performers were falling through the cracks and that it was for difficult for a new performer to catch the attention of an Artistic Director. Youth Discoveries was the solution. Over the past few years, committee members including Tara MacKenzie, Coco Love Alcorn, and Rob Elder—locals who know the value of community and the value of experience—have continued that work. From its beginnings, with preliminaries in Owen Sound and Paisley, the Discoveries series has widened the creative net. We now hold showcases as far afield as Toronto, London, Kitchener-Waterloo, and Clarksburg, looking for young performers who are ready to step up onto the big stage.

 

The Youth Discoveries has given formative experiences to some of the regions finest musicians––Ben Turcotte, Cody Zevenbergen, Andrew Nunno, Missy Bauman, Benjamin Dakota Rogers, Sydney Riley, and Brontae Hunter are just a few of the Discoveries winners who have continued on their musical path.

 

You have a chance to preview two of this year’s Youth Discoveries winners in Owen Sound today at the Owen Sound Summer Streetfest. Basset will be performing from 12:00-12:45 pm, Emily Gilbart from 4:45-5:30 pm on the stage located at Second Avenue East & 9th Street in downtown Owen Sound.

 

Basset is Sam Clark, with brothers Aaron and Noah Philipp-Muller. Playing mandolin, fiddle, guitar, and cello, they are part chamber orchestra, part newgrass––accomplished musicians weaving intricate arrangements. Layered over the instruments, is the haunting resonant vibrato of Yasmine Shelton. Together, they move from dark and moody to bright and catchy melodies with ease. It’s rare to find a band this young that has such a range. They shone at the preliminaries and, at the finals, were a clear favourite of both the audience and the judges.

 

They came together in 2016 as students of Victoria College at the University of Toronto, a hub of creative energy that introduced them to Toronto’s vibrant small-time arts scene. They’ve used the energy to good effect.

 

At the finals this year, Emily Gilbart, a young singer-songwriter from Mono, Ontario, took the air out the Roxy Theatre with her first note. Tall and self-assured, I think we were all expecting a willowy voice. But that first note—it was as if it came up out of her feet––so low, so very low. It was as if she had channelled the earth. Everybody in the theatre leaned back as we all gasped collectively.

TalentNation@Revival

TalentNation@Revival

Emily’s voice is not restricted to that earth tone and she uses it to good effect. At ten, she began singing and playing guitar and has been at it ever since. Playing open mic nights at local cafés and restaurants, she would end up getting regular paid gigs at some of those venues. For the past 3 years, Emily has been a scholarship recipient at the Orangeville & District Music Festival for her original compositions. In 2017, two of her songs made the semi-finals in the Under 18 category of the Canadian Songwriting Competition, and her song ‘Lovesick Lullaby’ was a finalist.  Not surprisingly, she is currently working on her first album.

 

Twelve minutes at a Youth Discoveries showcase is not a lot of time to sum up what you do, but Emily Gilbart and Basset certainly did!

 

You can get a preview of Basset and Emily Gilbert today at the Owen Sound Summer Streetfest–not to mention a 2013 Youth Discoveries winner– Jayden Grahlman– and Richard Knechtel as Dickie Bird. See even more of this year’s Youth Discoveries winners at the Summerfolk Music and Craft Festival, Kelso Beach Park, August 17,18 and 19. Find all the info at summerfolk.org.

Georgian Bay Roots Episode 92 – Canada Day with Jon

Georgian Bay Roots

With your hosts  Jon, Kailey, Kelly & Lauren


Every Sunday on CFOS 560 from 4-5pm, Georgian Bay Roots shares some of the best music that’s made in and played in Grey and Bruce Counties with roots music from across Canada and around the world thrown into the mix.

This week’s host, Jon Farmer brings the heart of a fan and the ear of  musician to the airwaves.

This is the Canada Day episode and the first two acts are dedicated to national narratives, symbols, and stories. In the final act of the show Jon shares songs from Summerfolk volunteers.

If you missed the live show, you can download it from Soundcloud or iTunes.
You can download an iTunes podcast here

Here’s the music!

Special thanks to the Owen Sound Transportation Company and Mariposa for sponsoring part of the show this week:
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Are you making music that you want us to share?
Do you have gig coming up that you want to promote?
Are you interested in being a sponsor or advertising on the show?
Contact us at georgianbayroots@summerfolk.org

If you missed the live show, you can download it from Soundcloud

OR

Visit our  iTunes podcast page for archived programs

Georgian Bay Roots Episode 91 – Lauren’s Debut

Georgian Bay Roots

With your hosts Dylan, Jon, Kailey, & Ted

36063804_1863337067300543_329531696498081792_oEvery Sunday on CFOS 560 from 4-5pm, Georgian Bay Roots shares some of the best music that’s made in and played in Grey and Bruce Counties with roots music from across Canada and around the world thrown into the mix.

This week’s host, Lauren Jewel, appears regularly on local stages with her bands Our Shotgun Wedding and the The Deer Devils and is often found in front of local stages spinning poi and cheering on her musical friends.

On this week’s edition of Georgian Bay Roots, Lauren Jewell makes her debut in the host’s chair. There will a varied playlist to celebrate Summer, National Indigenous People’s Day and the Fête Francophone. Artists on today’s episode includeDrew Mcivor MusicDeanne HallmanCaleb Smith & the North Country TowersCecile Doo-Kingue,MayhemingwaysGeorgian BayBran Sanders MusicLiv WadeSusan AglukarkGlass Tiger,Wrong JeremyMandolin OrangeCALANSerena RyderThe Silver HeartsWilliam Prince andJessica Allossery. Tune it or stream live at 4pm on AM 560!

Special thanks to the Owen Sound Transportation Company and Mariposa for sponsoring part of the show this week:
OS_Transportation_FeaturedImage

MariposaFolkFestival-LogoName-Iogo1
If you missed the live show, you can download it from Soundcloud or iTunes.
You can download an iTunes podcast here

Do you have gig coming up that you want to promote?
Are you interested in being a sponsor or advertising on the show?
Contact us at georgianbayroots@summerfolk.org

Archives

Visit our  iTunes podcast page for archived programs

Georgian Bay Roots Episode 89 – R.I.P Ted Rusk

Georgian Bay Roots

With your hosts Dylan, Jon, Kailey, & Ted


Every Sunday on CFOS 560 from 4-5pm, Georgian Bay Roots shares some of the best music that’s made in and played in Grey and Bruce Counties with roots music from across Canada and around the world thrown into the mix.

This week’s host, Dylan McMullin, appears regularly on local stages with his bands Our Shotgun Wedding and the Great Canadian Swampstompers and is often found in front of local stages cheering on his musical friends. He brings that talent and enthusiasm to the mic as one of the hosts of Georgian Bay Roots.

This week Dylan plays tracks by Pat RobitailleTegan and SaraSarah HarmerBruce CockburnLong John BaldryT. NileStephen FearingBahamas, and Bukka White. We lost our friend and co-host this week, Ted Rusk. Ted was also a prolific songwriter and musician and Dylan will play some of Ted’s songs to remember him by.

Special thanks to the Owen Sound Transportation Company and Mariposa for sponsoring part of the show this week:
OS_Transportation_FeaturedImage

MariposaFolkFestival-LogoName-Iogo1
If you missed the live show, you can download it from Soundcloud or iTunes.
You can download an iTunes podcast here

Do you have gig coming up that you want to promote?
Are you interested in being a sponsor or advertising on the show?
Contact us at georgianbayroots@summerfolk.org

Archives

Visit our  iTunes podcast page for archived programs

Georgian Bay Roots Episode 90 – Father’s Day with Kailey

Georgian Bay Roots

With your hosts Dylan, Jon, Kailey, & Ted

Every Sunday on CFOS 560 from 4-5pm, Georgian Bay Roots shares some of the best music that’s made in and played in Grey and Bruce Counties with roots music from across Canada and around the world thrown into the mix.

This week’s host, Kailey Jane Hawkins is an aspiring singer songwriter with a love for all things music. As Grey Bruce is home to such a rich community of artists, she’s excited to be part of the Georgian Bay Roots Radio team to help share that richness with the world

Happy Father’s Day from Georgian Bay Roots! This week’s episode features music about fathers, written in honour of fathers, and performed by fathers, as well as songs about stories and stories about songs. Featuring music by Jonathan Byrd, Matt Andersen, Sarah Harmer, The Harpoonist and the Axe Murderer, Bill Plaskett, Christine Lavin, Colm Wilkinson, The Good Lovelies, Irish Mythen, Cheryl Wheeler, Meaghan Smith, Trent Severn, and Walk Off The Earth!

You can download an iTunes podcast here

Special thanks to the Owen Sound Transportation Company and Mariposa for sponsoring part of the show this week:
OS_Transportation_FeaturedImage

MariposaFolkFestival-LogoName-Iogo1

Are you making music that you want us to share?
Do you have gig coming up that you want to promote?
Are you interested in being a sponsor or advertising on the show?
Contact us at georgianbayroots@summerfolk.org

Archives

Visit our  iTunes podcast page for archived programs

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Sun Times Article 6: Soul Run

Every year Artistic Director James Keelaghan writes a series of 12 articles for the Owen Sound Sun Times previewing the Summerfolk Music and Crafts Festival

By James Keelaghan

If you visit Tanika Charles’ page on summerfolk.org, you’ll hear a track called Soul Run. It’s lively, with a beat and an exuberance that makes you want to leap on stage and sing the backing vocals. The track also sounds like hope, which is interesting because the real life story behind the song belies the groove.

 

Charles was living outside Edmonton in an unhealthy relationship and it was time to get out. Grabbing the only vehicle available to make a break, she didn’t get far. It was a manual transmission and she had only ever driven an automatic. But it sometimes happens that once the first step is taken, there’s no stopping.

 

That was the beginning of what Tanika Charles calls her soul run. It took her from a northern Alberta farm to the centre of the Toronto music scene that has embraced her with all its heart.

 

When Tanika left Edmonton, she had no musical background, except for a well-developed love for her dad’s jazz record collection, Stevie Wonder and Bjork. She thought maybe comedy would be her meal ticket but auditioned for work as a background singer. As a backing vocalist with Bedouin Soundclash for two years and touring with Emmanuel Jal and Macy Gray, her exuberance, the crystal quality of her singing and her presence, made her a valued member of those groups.

 

It’s a time-honoured tradition in the world of soul and blues that you learn your chops in other people’s bands. It takes courage, though, to step out of that role and strike out on your own. Applying all that was learned on the road and in the studio to build her own career and her own band, in the best sense of the word, Tanika invented herself.

 

Starting the second lap of the soul run in 2010, Tanika released her first EP What! What? What!? She was among the headline performers at the prestigious Women in Blues concert at Toronto’s Massey Hall in 2012. In 2015, two singles were released as a teaser for a full-length project. Both charted well on CBC and, by May 2016, Tanika had dropped her debut CD. It was a hit. Soul Run was nominated for a Juno award in the R&B/Soul category where Tanika was the only woman nominated.

 

Now, on the third lap, she had a cross-Canada tour—not an easy thing to arrange on the release of the disc, dipped her toe in the world of theatre with the show Freedom Singer and is currently on a month long tour in Europe—not bad for someone who couldn’t drive a stick!

 

Samantha Martin also has running on her mind. Her 2018 release, Run to Me, is a blues tour de force—music with a backbone. But make no mistake, from the writing to the arrangements, everything on this CD supports the unshakeable pillar that is Samantha Martin’s voice. If harnessed, it could power a small city. It’s not just smoky—it’s a three-alarm fire.

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Since Samantha and Delta Sugar were last at Summerfolk, their debut album Send the Nightingale earned 4 Maple Blues nominations and they were chosen to represent Toronto at the International Blues challenge in Memphis. But we all know that she was really in Memphis representing the Grey Bruce.

 

Samantha was born in Edmonton, but her family has deep roots on the peninsula. At various stages in her life, she has found herself living on the shores of Georgian Bay where she has had a lot of formative musical relationships, notably with Trevor and Tara MacKenzie.

 

Her first EP was recorded at Trev’s studio with a full-length solo CD following in 2008. Four years later, Sam like Tanika, decided to form a band. Samantha Martin and the Haggard was a romp through blues, gospel, country and early rock and roll.

 

By 2015, Martin had sharpened her focus—Samantha Martin and Delta Sugar was born. The blues juggernaut owes its strength to the tripod of Martin, guitarist Mikey McCallum and drummer Dani Nash. It owes its sweetness to the unadulterated gospel-tinged, neuron-tingling magic of Samantha’s “co-vocalists,” Sherie Marshall and newest full time member Mwansa Mwansa. And just when you thought that was enough, along come the keyboards and the horn section. It’s a mighty sound.

 

Samantha actually has a couple of voices. The second one finds its way from pen to paper. Singing comes naturally to some folks, but there are no natural writers. It’s a craft that has to be worked on. Sam’s voice wouldn’t make sense without strong songs to sing so she’s has been sharpening her focus there as well. That voice, the one that actually writes the songs, has become as strong as the other one we hear on the recordings. The latest crop of tunes are spartan and heartfelt. Pulling no punches, they are as honest as her voice.

 

Whether you’re on a soul run, or you are running to Samantha Martin, you’ll find the finish line at the Summerfolk Music and Crafts Festival. It’s our 43rd year at Kelso Beach Park and the dates are August 17, 18, 19. Information about tickets, performers and much more can be found at summerfolk.org.

Halifax singer-songwriter Rose Cousins’ new album is called Natural Conclusion. Credit: Vanessa Heins.

Sun Times Article 5: Unbound Creativity

Every year Artistic Director James Keelaghan writes a series of 12 articles for the Owen Sound Sun Times previewing the Summerfolk Music and Crafts Festival

By James Keelaghan

I was skinnier then. I know that much.

 

Stephen Fearing and I met at the Jasper Folk Festival in 1986. We were both young, western singer-songwriters, both claiming an Irish lineage and sharing a lot of musical heroes, so it’s no surprise we became friends. Through those early days, we slept on each other’s couches when we were in each other’s towns and traded gig info, contacts, and a lot of pleasant time together when our paths crossed.

 

He doesn’t sleep on couches much anymore. Stephen, one of the beacons of the acoustic music scene, is loved and lauded for his soulful voice, blistering guitar work and evocative lyrics. Over the past thirty years, he’s released eleven solo albums, six albums with super group Blackie and the Rodeo Kings and another two with Belfast’s Andy White.

 

That discography speaks volumes about Stephen. Always a jammer, he loves digging in on a session—live or in the studio—generously sharing the stage and his recordings with new talent and with veterans such as Richard Thompson and Bruce Cockburn.

 

Though life began in Vancouver, his formative years were spent in Dublin, Ireland attending the same school as future members of U2! That trip, from Canada to Ireland became immortalized in Fearing’s epic, Longest Road—one of his most finely crafted songs.

 

In his heart, Stephen is a creature of the road. Returning to North America in his late teens, he spent time in Minneapolis before finding his way to Vancouver once more. He has since lived in Guelph and Halifax before finally returning to the West coast last year. Touring compulsively, it seems that there is hardly a night without a Fearing gig somewhere.

 

Now entering his third decade as performer, Stephen seems as effortless and light on his feet as way back when in Jasper. Certainly, he still has the same fire. A Fearing performance is like an approaching freight train with the rumbling of the tracks as the flawless rhythm rolls from the guitar, his voice like a distant, mournful klaxon. The intensity builds until it fills the space, theatre or field, with an unstoppable sound.

 

We run into each other every now and again, often in passing—a few stolen moments for lunch or an afternoon beer when our schedules magically coincide. He’s the same Stephen I met all those years ago, though he remains lanky and I do not.

 

Rose Cousins, I met in a different way. While Stephen and I were up-and-comers together, I heard of Rose Cousins long before I ever met her. Some artists are like that, with a reputation and music that arrives well ahead of their physical presence—the breeze that precedes the storm. Rose is a writer of exceptional ability and sensitivity who possesses a wit so dry that it’s practically arid—the voice of an angel with a mesmerizing presence.

 

When I finally met Rose, it was under the best of circumstances. We were both part of the songwriter’s house at the Celtic Colours Festival in 2008. The festival had decided to push the envelope from largely traditional music by including songwriters in a meaningful way—having us come to the festival to write. Every song that she penned, in collaboration over those six days, was a gem. I got to watch her write up close, note the attention to detail and the exhaustive search for just the right word or turn of phrase.

 

Rose was born and raised in PEI, lives in Halifax and has forged deep roots in the fabled music community that orbits a club called Passim in Cambridge, Massachusetts. But, wherever she is, the reaction to her voice and songwriting is universal praise throwing light on some of the dark places in our hearts—a soft, diffuse and sympathetic light. She has that rare gift of being able to take the intensely personal and make it universal.

 

Brave—did I mention that she is brave? Rose was enjoying the kind of success a lot of singer-songwriter’s crave. In 2013, with lauds from the press and lots of bookings, Rose realized that she had reached a limit. Living in fear of burn out, feeling the pressure that performance can place on the craft of writing, she decided to stop touring, with the exception of a few select dates. In order to refill the creative tank, she concentrated on other artistic endeavours, including her other artistic passion— photography. She spent time shooting, developing film, and printing photos using the dark room at the Nova Scotia School of Art and Design.

 

Rose also held a deep desire to develop skills in co-writing which she began to work on in Nashville during the fall of 2014. From then, and throughout the following year, she traveled to Los Angeles, Nashville, Toronto, Ireland, and Boston where her focused creative time yielding dozens of songs, photographs, relationships, and a much needed change of pace. Her goal was to connect with artists, writers, and producers to make songs in new ways, new sounds with new people, not knowing where they would go and not needing to know. The result of all that creative work was her latest album, Natural Conclusion.

 

You’ll be able to enjoy the music of Rose Cousins and Stephen Fearing at the Summerfolk Music and Crafts Festival, August 17, 18 and 19. You can listen to music by Rose and Stephen, find out about tickets and much more at summerfolk.org.

 

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