Aug 17,18,19 tickets

Category Archives: Summerfolk 40

The View From Stage Right

newland
By David Newland

The other day, my teenage daughter confronted me: “Dad, why are you still wearing that t-shirt? It’s ten years old!” I looked down, stunned. “What?! This is my Summerfolk 30th anniversary shirt!” Okay, guilty as charged. But I can explain…

In 2004, I’d been playing as a singer-songwriter in Ontario for a couple of years. Festival gigs were hard to come by. I had played at a Last Chance Saloon for a slot at Summerfolk, and despite many a plastic beer cup raised to my effort, I didn’t get the gig.

 I did, however, get a chance to walk through the site at Kelso Park, where so many of my musical heroes had played. Walking among the standing stones with the winter wind whipping off Georgian Bay, I dedicated myself to someday playing Summerfolk.

 Elsewhere on the scene, fellow performers and volunteers talked of great moments spent at Summerfolk; of Willie P. Bennett and Stan Rogers; of passionate fans lined up to place their tarps; of late night jams, summer storms and endless encores; of a volunteer corps second to none.

 I got invited to play one of the off-season GBFS songwriter series shows, in a lovely theatre above the old courthouse. I stayed in a B&B with a basement vault, a relic of the Prohibition era whiskey trade. At the Tom Thomson gallery, I discovered the painter’s mandolin, a poignant artifact I have made a point of visiting time and again. If I couldn’t play the festival (yet) I could love and admire the place. And I did.

 When Liz Harvey-Foulds took over as AD in 2005, she hired some musical friends of mine, and one of them, Jory Nash, asked if I could help out as a volunteer stage host at the Homemade Jam stage. I jumped at the chance. You know the old saying: if you can’t dazzle them with brilliance, baffle them with… hosting. People I’d been listening to for years were playing: Tanglefoot, Rita Chiarelli, Garnet Rogers. I got to sit in on an Ian Tamblyn workshop! I was hooked.

 The following year I was back, hosting Down By the Bay. The dream was coming true by tiny increments. Prairie Oyster, Lynn Miles, Crooked Still… I was still a fan, but now I was finding myself backstage with these folks. On Sunday morning I caught the gospel workshop from my canoe, Suzie Vinnick’s voice echoing off the grain elevators.

 In 2009, with Richard Knechtel at the helm, I was back with my band, The McFlies. Rocking Down By the Bay, right before Hoots and Hellmouth on the Saturday night, was one of my favourite musical moments ever. The next day, Sharon, of Sharon, Lois & Bram showed up at a kids’ workshop I was hosting and joined me onstage for Skinnimarink. Does it get any better?

 It did. In 2011, Richard called again: how about hosting mainstage? Yes sir, I said. Summerfolk was one of seven festivals I did that year with my fiancée by my side, weeks before our wedding. Now I had someone to share all my favourite things with: the steam powered corn cooker, the deep fried turkey legs. The beach and the tipi and the smiling faces now becoming familiar: Pete Miller driving the shuttle van, Ariel Rogers managing the tweeners. Steve and Steve in the CIUT tent. The instrument petting zoo!

 In 2012, Summerfolk had a new Artistic Director, and I had a new album. James Keelaghan offered me a night hosting mainstage again, the usual workshop slots and a spot in a brand new venue: the Wine Bar. Now my wife was pregnant and the in-laws were along in support. Summerfolk had become a multi-generational affair in more ways than one: Nathan Rogers (with Dry Bones) took to the stage named after his father, just one among a slew of acts like Chic Gamine, Al Simmons, H’SAO, and my old buddy Dave Gunning. Wow.

 Two years later came another call from Keelo, this time with a bold request: would I host all three nights on main stage? On that long-ago winter’s day, all I’d hoped for was the chance to play the festival one day. And now I would be introducing the likes of Laura Cortese, Oh Suzannah, and the incredible Buffy Ste. Marie? Yes, I said. YES!

 And now here we are in 2015. Once again, I find myself heading to Owen Sound to host mainstage at Summerfolk. Now, it’s not just heroes, but colleagues and friends I have the honour of introducing: Up-and-comers, the Young Novelists. Ukulele wizard James Hill and the wildly talented Shari Ulrich. Samantha Martin, whose band will simply blow people away. The profound and insightful Evalyn Parry and the passionate and inspiring Digging Roots. The outlandish Steve Poltz and the haunting Sarah MacDougall. Joel Plaskett! Trout Fishing in America! Whitehorse!

 So yeah, I’m still wearing my volunteer t-shirt from 2005. It’s not yet holey, but it’s kinda… holy. Still, I may pick up a new one this year. Summerfolk 40? Sounds like a dream come true to me.

Workshops and Festival Magic

Randy represents the audience at the Songs from a Hat workshop in 2014

Randy represents the audience at the Songs from a Hat workshop in 2014

By James Keelaghan

We have a lot of people who buy tickets to the festival before we announce even one name from the lineup. They know that what happens at Summerfolk is unique. They don’t need to see a lineup to know that the entertainment will be top notch.

The schedule for the entire weekend is up on the website now. I looked at the spike in web traffic when we posted it. I knew what was going on. The serious were handicapping the schedule.

They were figuring out how to maximize their time at the festival. Plotting how to see everybody that they want to see. I also see it in that first hour on site, before the music has actually begun. The calm before the song, as it were. People are hunched over their programs, the highlighting tool of their choice in their hands. They are circling things.

Every year, we hear same thing,“ you can’t possibly see it all ”. It’s true, you can’t. With seven daytime stages and two to three evening stages, you’d have to have clones to take it all in.

It’s my job to program all that activity. Eighty-eight separate shows that add up to one festival. I would like to take all the credit, or blame for that, but the ideas for the workshops come from a lot of different places.

When performers return their paperwork for the festival, they also return a sheet where they have listed their workshop ideas.

Workshops, if you haven’t seen them, take a few performers, give them a theme and sixty minutes or so on stage. Performers play to the theme, but if they are feeling particularly comfortable, they start playing with each other. The very best workshops end up with the performers becoming a pick-up band. It’s electric.

They might also mention people they would love to be in a workshop with. The Bombadil’s really wanted to do a workshop with Grit Laskin. Done ( Saturday August 22 11AM, Down BY the Bay stage). Ann Lederman wanted to do a workshop with Bruce Molsky. Done ( Sunday afternoon, August 23rd, 4:30 at the Wine Bar. Be there or be square).

There are often existing relationships between musicians that you know will bear fruit in a workshop. Leonard Podolak is at the festival this year with his group, the Duhks. Mark Schatz is here as part of Claire Lynch’s band. Mark and Leonard have known each other for years. Mark produced two of the early Duhks’ records. He also taught Leonard to hambone and clog. Clogging, you are probably familiar with, or you can take a wild guess and probably will be right. Hambone, you might not be familiar with. It’s a form of dance mixed with body percussion and it’s a great thing to watch and an ever better thing to do. Master and student will teach it all to you at Noon on the Sunday of Summerfolk ( Over The Hill stage).

There are many other instructional workshops over the weekend. David Essig has a workshop called Art of the Jam that could help those who tend to stall out around the campfire. How about learning how to write a haiku, be a part of the Summerfolk choir, or learn how to spin poi?

Other workshops are about throwing musicians together and, with the relaxation that comes from the Summerfolk atmosphere, magic happens, not to mention a few sparks. I anticipate the last workshop on the Down By the Bay Stage, Sunday afternoon, called Groove Summit with Whitehorse, The Mackenzie Blues Band, and Samantha Martin and Delta Sugar is going to take the roof off the tent.

Another Down by the Bay workshop (1PM Saturday), Songs from a Hat has become a favourite of the audiences in the past few years.
The idea is simple. I have a hat. It’s filled with song titles written on long scraps of paper. Steve Poltz, Anne Beverley Foster, Trout Fishing in America and David Woodhead square off against the audience. The challenge is to sing at least the first verse and chorus of a song pulled from my hat. If the pros can’t do it, it’s up to the audience. There’s only one other rule. Don’t throw the microphone!

Shari Ulrich, Claire Lynch, Wendy McNeill and Sarah MacDougall are four writers with very different styles, but my bet is they find common ground at a workshop called “Wolf at the door”, (Down by the Bay, Sunday at noon).

Those are just a few of the things we have in store for you. The best part is, you still don’t know what it is that is going to surprise you.

You’ll find the weekend schedule and everything else you need to know about Summerfolk at summerfolk.org. The 40th annual Summerfolk Music and Crafts Festival happens August 20-23 at Kelso Beach Park, Owen Sound and is brought to you through the efforts of the Georgian Bay Folk Society.

A workshop on the Down by the Bay stage in 2014

A workshop on the Down by the Bay stage in 2014

Fruitful artists have roots in tradition

Joel Plaskett

Joel Plaskett

By James Keelaghan

Several years ago, I was teaching at a music camp in New Jersey. I had a group of about 16 songwriters as students. On the first night they invited me down to a songwriters’ circle at one of the cabins. I went, stayed for one round through the circle, and said my “good nights”. I then went and played for two hours with the contra dance band.

The next day, they asked what I thought about the circle. My inner Canadian was still asleep and instead of being polite, I said what was on my mind. I told them that the best thing they could do as songwriters was to go back home and find a traditional band to play with-traditional Irish, traditional Rock and Roll, it didn’t matter. They were writing songs that had no tie to any tradition, except a singer songwriter tradition. To write better songs, they had to grow some roots. Case in point-Joel Plaskett.

Joel is a node. He’s one of these people who works well with others. He has written the occasional song with Matt Andersen. He produced the latest James Hill CD. He’s recorded and performed with Rose Cousins and Anne Egge. He’s played everything from orchestral shows to Cafes. Later this month, he’ll be performing as part of the Interstellar Allstars for the Interstellar Rodeo in Edmonton with Kathleen Edwards and Luke Doucet. He clearly likes to play. He likes to explore and bring people along for the ride.

Joel has spent most of his career in bands-Nabisco Fonzie, The Thrush Hermits, Neuseiland and his eponymous Joel Plaskett Emergency. Lately, he’s been appearing more as a solo or a duo. It allows him to be more nimble, to switch up the material. He’s a great live performer, relaxed and comfortable. His melodies are catchy. Though he has dabbled in a lot of styles musically, his lyrics maintain a consistent conversational tone. There’s a lot of storytelling.

Joel has enjoyed and is enjoying the kind of success that independent artists aspire to. Great sales, sold out concerts, nominations and awards are all fruits of hard work and talent. But there is something else.

Joel is, in fact, a poster child for the value of exposing kids to live music.

Before moving to Halifax, Joel grew up in Lunenburg Nova Scotia.The town is the embodiment, in wood and stone, of what every Canadian imagines Nova Scotia to be. Trim wooden houses rise up from the harbour. It looks prosperous because it was. The Bluenose is the most famous of the vessels that was built in that harbour, but she was only one of thousands born in Lunenburg’s cradles. In the mid 1800s, there could be as many as 18 vessels under construction at a time. There may be busloads of tourists now posing before the picturesque, but it’s still a working harbour.

Joel’s father, Bill Plaskett, is a musician in his own right. He was one of the founders of the Lunenburg Folk Harbour Festival. On festival weekend the town is dominated by the tent atop Blockhouse Hill, the highest point in town. Music also happens on the docks on the waterfront.

From the beginning, the festival was plagued by a lack of accommodation for the musicians. Volunteers and members of the board offered their houses as billets. Kitchen parties at the Plaskett house during the festival were a big event, but there was live music in the house all year round. Joel did not learn to be a musician in isolation, it was part of the fabric of his youth.

Evalyn Parry, who is going to be with us at Summerfolk this year, puts it this way

I was raised in a tradition: squeeze boxes in the kitchen.
Heads thrown back, call and response, feet stomping, gut strings thrumming.
Believing in the songs I was raised with .
Songs sung from festival stages, around campfires…
You can circumnavigate the globe in song, but you know you are home
When you know all the words

That’s why Nova Scotia, or Winnipeg, or the Ottawa Valley continue to produce consistently great musicians. There is a tradition of music being part of the everyday fabric of life.

That’s essentially what I was trying to say to that group of writers in New Jersey. They had some catching up to do. You don’t write good songs unless you come out of some sort of tradition. The more music you are exposed to in your youth, the better you will be. Luckily, it’s never too late to have a great childhood.

Joel Plaskett will be playing in the amphitheatre at Kelso Beach on Friday, August 21. He will do a workshop on Saturday Morning at 11AM with James Hill and Steve Poltz. They are just three of the over 40 acts that will be playing the Summerfolk Music and Crafts Festival August 20-23. Tickets and information can be found at summerfolk.org.

Deep Roots at Summerfolk

By James Keelaghan
The other day, I was doing research into Canadian folk festivals. Every now and again, I like to go old school on the fact finding. I went to my Canadian Encyclopedia. In the entry for folk festivals, 6 festivals are mentioned-Winnipeg, Vancouver, Edmonton, Mariposa, Miramichi and…Summerfolk in Owen Sound. We’re even a little more prominent in the online version.

 

When the first Summerfolk debuted in 1976, I was 15 years old. I had never been to a folk festival. There wasn’t one in Calgary. We had a folk scene that was just beginning to take hold. There were house concerts at Lynn and Barry Luft’s place as well as Tommy Makem and Liam Clancy recording a television series at the local TV station, CFAC. There were plenty of clubs with acoustic music, but I was too young to frequent them because they served the demon alcohol.

 

Over here in Owen Sound, two brothers, Tim and John Harrison decided it was time for a festival. Out of thin air, with the help of friends and volunteers, they launched Summerfolk. It would take Calgary and Edmonton another 6 years to start festivals of their own.

 

I came to Summerfolk for the first time when I was 25. That was just shy of the 10th anniversary. I was the guitar player for a Scottish folk singer named Margaret Christl. It was the first time I had gigged east of Regina.

 

At the time, the festival at the time housed performers in a downtown hotel on 2nd Ave E. I have quizzed people about this, but there doesn’t seem to be agreement on what the hotel actually was. I distinctly remember there being a sign on the front that said St James, because a friend and I kept referring to the place as the St James Infirmary. There was a respectable motel attached to the back, but the hotel itself seemed like it might have been used as a squat. All the rooms were funkily decorated. There was an elevator that required an operator and a swimming pool that had been drained. I played a late night game of imaginary water polo in that pool with Odetta, Ron Casat and several others.

 

The hotel sessions at Summerfolk have always been legendary. I availed myself. I jammed hard on the Friday night with a group of people up in my 2nd floor room.

 

The next morning, when I arrived on site a woman, who I now know was Sandy Hogg pulled me aside and told me “her crew” had been singing my praises. She wanted to know who I was, precisely and she wanted to hear me sing.

 

I played the festival another eight times. I came to love it because it marked, in the sweetest way, the end of the summer touring. If you were lucky you started at Bumbershoot or Seattle Folklife in May, and ended up in August, right here beside Georgian Bay. I’ve always loved the fact that Summerfolk made it easy for musicians to play together. Since I took over as Artistic Director, I’ve made it my priority to keep that feel. There is, after all, a four-decade long tradition to uphold.

 

Since Summerfolk is turning 40, we are going to celebrate with a Birthday Bash!

 

The first Summerfolk opened on August 20, so the decision was made to crank up the site for Thursday August 20th this year. We are going to celebrate in style! There is a new tent for the Down By the Bay Stage. We’re going to raise the roof with 3 hours of outstanding music from Ottawa’s MonkeyJunk and New Brunswick’s Matt Andersen.

 

Matt Andersen

Matt Andersen

When Matt played the festival 4 years ago, he sold the most recordings of any solo artist in our history. Matt is real. He sings with his entire being. Since then, he has recorded a fantastic new album produced by Steve Berlin ( Los Lobos, Tragically Hip). He’s been keeping up a gruelling tour schedule, but wanted to be with us to celebrate our birthday!

 

He has over 2 million views on YouTube, platinum-sized independent cd sales, a 2013 European Blues Award, and won Best Solo Performer at the Memphis Blues Challenge. The entire world is now discovering what we at Summerfolk always knew-Matt Andersen is a powerhouse performer with a giant soul-filled voice and commanding stage presence. He has built a formidable following the old fashioned way–touring worldwide letting his reputation spread through word of mouth.

 

Also on the bill is MonkeyJunk. They are a powerhouse swamp rock R&B band with a fistful of awards and nominations. I’ve been trying to get these guys to the festival for a few years. It’s extra special that they will be making it for our 40th birthday.

 

MonkeyJunk

MonkeyJunk

You can buy your ticket to the Thursday Birthday Bash as a single night ticket or add it to your weekend pass. All the information you need is at summerfolk.org  or on our facebook page facebook.com/Summerfolk

 

The Summerfolk Music and Crafts Festival happens at Kelso beach in Owen Sound August 20, 21, 22 and 23, 2015.

*This article first appeared in the Owen Sound Sun Times on June 5th, 2015

Claire Lynch Has The Voice

By James Keelaghan
Every now and again I play a little game with myself. I imagine which musician I would like to be. Sometimes I’d like to be Phil Ochs, sometimes Captain Beefheart. Lately, I’ve wanted to be Claire Lynch.

ClaireLynch

Claire Lynch and band

 

Claire possesses that high reedy voice that is the hallmark of Anglo-American roots music. It’s reminiscent of Alison Krauss or Hazel Dickens. She can whip you into a frenzy with a holler or seduce you with a lullaby. When Dolly Parton says you are one of her favourite vocalists you must be doing something right. The International Bluegrass Association agrees. Claire Lynch is a three time winner of their Female Vocalist of the Year award.

 

There are singers and there are songwriters. Sometimes you have singers who sing their own songs but they really aren’t writers. Sometimes you have songwriters who sing their own songs, but they aren’t really singers. It’s very rare that you find someone who can really do both.

 

Claire Lynch is that person. Her songs have been recorded by Patty Loveless, Kathy Mattea and others. At the IBMA’s last year she also won the Best Song award for “Dear Sister”. The song is based on letters written between a brother and sister on the eve of the Civil War battle of Stone River. It fuses the world of the traditional and the original.

 

Her band is an astounding group in and of themselves. Mandolinist-guitarist Jarrod Walker is a soulful singer and skilled player. Bryan McDowell is a young string wizard who, at 18, had an unprecedented hat-trick at the Winfield, Kansas National Flat-picking Championship winning first place in fiddle, mandolin, and flat-picked guitar. Mark Schatz is a two-time IBMA-winning bassist-clawhammer banjo player-dancer-percussionist. He makes the coffee as well.

 

Mark Schatz also has a close connection to a member of the Winnipeg band, The Duhks. Some of you may remember Leonard Podolak being here 4 years ago with Dry Bones. One of the highlights of their sets was the hambone solos. Leonard learned to hambone and clog from Mark. Schatz also produced one of the Duhks recordings.

TheDuhks

The Duhks

 

I met Leonard Podolak when he was 10 years old. My band and I arrived in Winnipeg by train early on a cold October morning and cabbed it over to Mitch Podolak’s house. Mitch was the concert promoter for the show we were playing in town that night. He is also the legendary creator of the Winnipeg, Vancouver and Edmonton Folk Festivals.

 

I knocked on the door. There was the scurry of feet. The door swung open and a cloud of smoke billowed out. Leonard’s ten year old face screamed, ”I’m makin’ pancakes”!!

 

His level of enthusiasm has never dimmed.

 

He grew up in a house that was the centre of folk music in Winnipeg. The Podolak place housed anybody who was anybody in folk music. Stan Rogers, Utah Phillips, Odetta, Tom Paxton, Spirit of the West, you name them, they slept in the spare room. Leonard soaked it all up getting lessons and advice from them all. Banjo became his area of expertise, but he also learned how to build and run a band.

 

The Duhks, Grammy nominees and Juno award winners, play a high energy version of Old Time music. They get their instrumental power from the guitar, banjo and violin. The Duhks added a signature percussionist to give it more drive and then topped it all off with an incredible lead vocalist, Jessee Havey.

 

Jessee joined the band as a teenager. She received her musical education on the road. Because of the immense touring range of the band—they regularly play in the US, Europe and Australia—Jessee was able to learn from cajun musicians, traditional British singers and jazz greats.

 

The band has always described itself as polyethnic. It has certainly taken that approach with its material, but the band is diverse as well. Fiddler Anna Lindblad is from Sweden and brings a nordic style to the strings. Less raw, more melodic, but still capable of unstoppable groove. Guitarist/bouzouki player Colin Savoie-Levac is from Quebec where he’s in great demand. He splits his time between the Duhks and filling in when needed for Éric Beaudry in star trad trio De Temps Antan. He also guides his own group, Les Poules à Colin. Drummer/percussionist Kevin Garcia is from Detroit originally but now make Brooklyn his home where he plays with, well, everybody.

 

The Duhks has been a labour of love for over 14 years. Doc Watson, no less, said, “Oh God, it is so beautiful, some of the finest music I’ve heard in many a day.”

 

The band has evolved over the years, losing and adding members as bands do. What has never changed is the absolute dedication to producing music that is true, focused and as enthusiastic as a 10 year old making pancakes for the guests.

 

Claire Lynch and the Duhks are just two of the over 40 acts that will be playing the Summerfolk Music and Crafts festival this year. The festival happens August 20, 21, 22, 23 at Kelso beach in Owen Sound, just like it has for 40 years. You can find information about the festival at www.summerfolk.org

 

*This article first appeared in the Owen Sound Sun Times on June 19th, 2015

The Birthday Bash – Because 40 Years is a Big Deal

matt_anderson_photo1webSUMMERFOLK is turning forty. The Georgian Bay Folk Society is throwing a party to celebrate and you are invited. The festival you know and love will start one day earlier in 2015 in honour of our 40th anniversary. This year, we’ll kick off with a Birthday Bash featuring Matt Andersen on Thursday, August 20th. We’ll break in our new Down by the Bay tent with a night of blues and brews with the gates opening at 7pm. But, we can’t do it by ourselves so we need help.

Matt Andersen is a JUNO-nominated blues powerhouse from New Brunswick, known for his soulful vocals and stellar guitar riffs. The last time Matt was at Summerfolk  he sold more CDs than any other act. Folks were eager to take his music home and the GBFS was eager to have him back. With over 2 million views on YouTube, independent sales over 30,000 albums, a 2013 European Blues Award, and winning Best Solo Performer at the Memphis Blues Challenge, it appears that the entire world is now discovering Matt Andersen. A powerhouse performer with a giant soul-filled voice and commanding stage presence, Matt has built a formidable following the old fashioned way – touring worldwide and letting the converted audiences and Andersen devotees spread his reputation through word of mouth.
Also on the bill, Ottawa blues juggernaut MonkeyJunk.They pile a mix of musical influences on to a solid bedrock of blues to put on a show that gets audiences moving. Since 2010, MonkeyJunk has brought home awards on both sides of the border including the 2010 Blues Music Award for Best New Artist, the 2012 Juno for Blues Album of the Year, and a 2014 Canadian Independent Music Award for Blues Artist/Group of the Year. 
You can turn your 3-day weekend pass into a 4-day musical adventure for just $35. If the Birthday Bash is all you want, tickets are $40 in advance and $45 at the door. We’ve got 40 years worth of memories and music to celebrate and we’ll need all the help we can get. Hope to see you there.

MonkeyJunk

MonkeyJunk

Now with even more Thursday

summerfolk2015_logo_slide-5

Lordy Lordy Look Who’s Forty

That would be Summerfolk.

Forty years is a significant milestone whether you are a festival, a human or even a sea turtle.

That’s why, this year, we’ll be celebrating our 40th with a birthday bash on Thursday, August 20th at Kelso Beach.

We’ve got a beautiful new clearspan tent for the Down By the Bay stage, big enough have 1000 of you under cover, and with no interior poles the new tent means there is not a bad seat in the house.

We’re finalizing the details on the performers for the Thursday so watch this blog and our Facebook page for updates…

On the site during the daytime we will also have more of you covered. Looking back in the archive we noticed some pictures of a tent covering the audience at the Gazebo. How wise were the old ones! We’ll be doing the same this year.

A Clear span tent for the Over the Hill Dance area means that we will have a dance floor free of obstruction. No poles, just clear sailing.

Summerfolk 40. Great music, Great people always

All of these new features are made possible by a grant we received from the Ontario Music Fund.

Tickets for the thursday night are separate from the 3-weekend pass. Ticket info here.

OMDCPNG

Underneath any great festival are great sponsors.
  • OTF.
  • Canadian Heritage
  • CH- Endowment
  • omdc-400x400-300x300
  • ONT150
  • OAC resize
  • CFGB 2014 web
  • ONTARIO
  • RT07 -BGS
  • Socan
  • OS Transport -resize
  • The Dock coloured
  • RogersTV 2016
  • Sun Times
  • BrucePowerT_process300
  • Mix1065-colour
  • ticketpro
  • Northridge Property Management
  • Georgian Shores Marina
  • index_en
  • CIUT 89.5FM
  • Collins Barrow 2015
  • Keelings
  • Banquet
  • McIntee 60 yrs
  • Quenchbuggy website
  • Lakeview-RV
  • GB Electric
  • Uhaul
  • Exclaim
  • Foodland logo
  • breadheads
  • Fox Chrysler logo
  • Caframo
  • TG Group Insurance
  • Long & McQuade
  • Long's Picnic Table
  • Albright Trucking logo
  • The Grey Bruce Escape
  • Miller Photoplaques
  • Advanced Pain Relief
  • Home Hrdware
  • Zehrs Markets - web logo