Aug 16,17,18 2019 tickets

Tag Archives: Children’s area

20170820-6929

Sun Times Article 9: Family Fun

Every year Artistic Director James Keelaghan writes a series of 12 articles for the Owen Sound Sun Times previewing the Summerfolk Music and Crafts Festival

By James Keelaghan

A couple of years back, my family and I were at the Mariposa Folk Festival. They had lots of great stuff for kids—giant bubble makers, magic and plenty of music. What our boys couldn’t get enough of, though, were the reptiles. The turtles, snakes, skinks and frogs were endlessly fascinating.

 

Roxane Davidson, our General Manager/Festival Coordinator, must have thought me a little loony. She asked, “What did you like at Mariposa?” and maybe a little too enthusiastically I blurted, “Reptiles! We gotta book some reptiles!” It’s taken a long time, but they will be slithering, hopping and skidding their way to Summerfolk this year, thanks to Scales Reptile Park. Scales does interactive displays so the kids and you can get up close and personal with your favourites. They will be doing demonstrations at 1PM on both Saturday and Sunday.

 

Family is very important to us at Summerfolk. That’s why we ask you to check in just inside the main gate at the First Aid/Child Registration trailer.  In the rare circumstance that you end up in opposite directions, we like to facilitate your getting back together. After that is taken care of, there is plenty of stuff to do for the kids and grandkids too. Some of my most treasured memories of Summerfolk are bound up with the things my kids have made in the crafts area. Coordinator, Cassandra Bauer, leads a whole volunteer crew that runs our children’s village. They spend the year gathering supplies and drawing up projects for the kids.

 

The children are set loose on tables full of paper and glue, paint and fabric. Under supervision, they bang away with hammers building ships, cars and even, on one occasion, a full on miniature beach chair that was then put to good use. The kids make masks, banners and decorate T-shirts. They also spend some time decorating a forty-foot long dragon that is the centre-piece of the children’s parade.

 

The parade was added to the festival a few years ago at Roxane’s suggestion. The dragon, articulated by the children, weaves its way through the procession. The kids fall in line with stilt-walkers and musicians and wend their way through the park arriving at the amphitheatre to open the Sunday evening show. Leading the parade this year will be Tallbeat.

 

Bringing together the circus element of stilt walking with its gigantic, taller-than-life performers, Tallbeat plays Maracatu style—an Afro-Brazilian drumming style with deep bassy grooves that move the soul. They can be seen and heard over 200m away with their colourful costumes and oversized instruments. Tallbeat raises Afro-Brazilian rhythms to new heights!

 

Summerfolk is a generational event. Grandparents, parents and children are all in it together in a safe welcoming space. Anyone who knows Kelso Beach Park knows that the splash pad and wading in the bay are a great way to entertain the young ‘uns, too.

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On Saturday afternoon this year, we are trying something a little different—a dedicated kids’ concert in the Amphitheatre with the one and only Fred Penner. One of the most popular acts at Summerfolk a couple of years ago, and not just with the kids, people of all ages flocked to his shows for chance to relive memories. From the quintessential version of The Cat Came Back to everybody’s favourite, Sandwiches, Fred delivers the goods and is as entertaining now as he was back in his television heyday.

 

Then, there’s the music. Although we have featured kids’ performers like Fred, we’ve found that kids, in fact, like all kinds of music. I love being at a stage and watching them feel the music—dancing, swaying and wide-eyed with appreciation. But it cuts both ways—a lot of performers are parents as well. Often they are away from their children while with us at Summerfolk and you can watch them light up when there are kids in audience.

 

Summerfolk has been putting smiles on faces for 43 years. We will be in Kelso Beach Park August 17, 18 and 19 this year. For information on what’s going on, check us out at www.summerfolk.org.

 

20150821-9787

Summerfolk is For Kids … Too

By David Newland

Ask what “folk” means as a musical genre, and the conversation could go on for weeks. One thing we can all agree on is that the “folk” in “folk festival” means people. At Summerfolk, that includes little people — in a big way. Kids, in fact, are in many ways at the heart of the festival.

I’ll be honest: I never thought a lot about the family-friendly aspect of folk festivals when I first started attending them. Why would I have? I was a teenager at the time. If anything, I was there to get away from my family! Even when I started to play festivals and to help organize them, my main thought was for the main stage.

It took becoming a parent myself to help me realize that not only are festivals great for kids — kids are also great for festivals. The past few years at Summerfolk have shown me just how vital the family experience is to the whole feeling of the festival itself.

Any performer with family -– indeed any festival patron with family -– will tell you that the whole experience changes with kids in the picture. The late nights are gone, replaced with early mornings. Camping is no longer just a matter of crashing in a tent; it’s all about logistics and meal planning and such. The main stage in the evening may or may not be doable– and by and large, the beer tent fades a bit as little ones come into the picture — an adjustment, to be sure.

The good news, though, is that it’s not that hard of an adjustment to make at Summerfolk. In fact, having kids along makes the whole experience richer and more interesting in a number of ways –- for everyone!

little girl pink hat by stage Summerfolk 2015 Saturday August 22 2015 image by ©kerry JARVIS-38

Summerfolk lets young fans get close to the fun

Think of the site itself. An adult might see it as a place for both healthy and junk food and for shopping for that special piece in the artisan village. The adult may be looking for that opportunity to discover some lesser-known performers along with the well-known ones and have an opportunity to purchase a CD or two in the General Store.

From the child’s point of view, it’s a village –- a world unto itself, really, with its own rules and feelings and textures. At night, it looks magical with the special lighting in the trees, in the Amphitheatre and under the tents. To see a folk festival through a child’s eyes is also to see a small community that honours creativity, the arts, and the environment as if that were the most ordinary thing in the world. Plus, it’s just plain fun.

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The Children’s Village

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We have crafts for folkies young and old.

Like a village it has it’s pathways as well. This year the wildly popular Storywalk returns. The Storywalk is an initiative of the Owen Sound Public Library. Starting at the front gate and leading to the children’s area this year’s selection, The Man with the Violin, gives the children insight into the world of music and provides an interactive reading experience. The book is available at the retail store and last year’s selection sold out in a matter of hours.

Pages from last year's story walk

Pages from last year’s Storywalk

Summerfolk, in fact, is the kind of world many of us are hoping to help create for our kids. And even if you don’t have kids, or your kids have grown, seeing this temporary village operate the way it does—for the young, and the young at heart alike—is good for the soul.

Action speaks louder than words when it comes to understanding how important kids are to Summerfolk. In Children’s Area, there is a list of activities available –- making a beaded bracelet, making a costume for the parade, designing a mask, building your own drum as well as a spaghetti sensory workshop from 11 am to 2 pm each day. There is also the usual playdoh and face painting by professionals and more.

For peace of mind you can have have your children registered as you come through the main gate at the First Aid trailer on the right. No one wants to see a child lose sight of a parent but if this happens, the job of reconnecting you and your kids is is made easier.

There are some very cool workshops going on during the festival that kids and their parents won’t want to miss that include learning how to walk on stilts, juggling and spinning thanks to Lookup Theatre and Vita Twirlin’ Diva.

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Young stilt walkers from Look Up Theatre will animate the site all weekend

Consider the kids’ parade that snakes through the site on Sunday afternoon. Led by the Gypsy Kumbia Orchestra, they’ll be costumed, masked, and in full voice when they arrive at main stage! Banging and blowing and honking and marching like a combination of a mamba snake and a mambo line, the Summerfolk parade is like a Dr. Seuss Book come to life.

Like all of us at age 41, Summerfolk is enjoying its maturity, in part by passing on the excitement to the next generation. Sure, Down By the Bay is still one of the greatest beer tents anywhere, but if your late nights with the gang have turned to early mornings with the kids, there’s a lot worth waking up for. Elephant Thoughts Educational Outreach is bringing a dino dig — complete with a 25-foot dinosaur!

Folk, of course, means music too. Summerfolk’s kids’ performers are some of the very best — Magoo, for example. The legendary madcap songster with his winged helmet, roller skates, ukulele and sprawling wacky wardrobe is second only to Santa in the esteem of children across the folk scene.

Magoo is also famous for his fashion tips.

Magoo is also famous for his fashion tips.

Folk music often addresses the challenges of our times. Enter Ben Spencer with his Songs for Terrible Children. Born on the prairies, resident in Montreal, Ben’s clever satire tackles body image, diversity, bullying, and environmental concerns in a way that is both topical –- and hilarious.

Ben Spencer

Ben Spencer

Even the food is kid-friendly. Who doesn’t love the usual hamburgers, hotdogs, angel fries, pizza, lemonade, kettle corn, deep-fried mars bars, cotton candy and more to discover.

And the best part? Children under 12 accompanied by an adult get in FREE at Summerfolk. That’s a price anyone can afford, for an event everyone can enjoy. You won’t want to miss the 41st annual Summerfolk Music and Crafts Festival on August 19, 20, and 21st at Kelso Beach Park. There’s more info at summerfolk.org.

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