Aug 16,17,18 2019 tickets

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Adonis Cuba Car Promo Shot

Sun Times Article 3: From Cuba to Canada

Every year Artistic Director James Keelaghan writes a series of 12 articles for the Owen Sound Sun Times previewing the Summerfolk Music and Crafts Festival

By James Keelaghan

To make my living I have to travel—a lot. While the travelling has some nice moments, it’s not relaxing and it is most assuredly not a vacation. About 10 years ago myself, my wife and my son actually took a vacation. We went to Cuba for a week. I enjoyed the sun, the sand and the general laid back nature of the island, but it was the music that really hooked me. The resort where we stayed, on the Ancon peninsula near Trinidad de Cuba, was far away from the hustle and bustle of Havana or the  non-stop tourism of Varadero. Still, every night there was music at the resort, there was music in town, there was literally music everywhere at all hours.

 

Latin music has a reputation for being sultry and sensual, but Cuban music takes it to the nth degree. I loved it before I went to Cuba, but I was a fanatic by the time I came back.

When the chance came to book Adonis Puentes for this year’s Summerfolk I jumped at it.

 

I mentioned in last week’s article that traditional music is important to me. It’s not just the traditional music of my ancestors, though. Traditional music, in all its forms, is the backbone of what I try to book for Summerfolk. I like music that is aware of its history, even if it plays with it some.

 

We had Adonis’ brother, Alex Cuba, here a few years back. Alex has taken the music of his youth and added contemporary flourishes creating his own Latin pop sound. Adonis Puentes is a traditionalist. They grew up south of Havana in a house that was musically dominated by their father, Valentin, and spiritually by their mother, Maria. By the age of six they were playing guitar, eventually joining their father’s 24 piece travelling guitar ensemble. On days off they found time to jam with some of the greats, among them Ibrahim Ferrar of Buena Vista Social Club fame.

 

Love brought both Alex and Adonis to Canada, and though they recorded their first cd as the Puentes Brothers, they soon branched out on their own. The quality of their early musical education has seen both of them garnering Juno and Grammy nominations for their work, even while they have charted different musical paths.

 

Adonis is firmly in the tradition of the soñero—the lyrical, sometimes improvising, singer in a Salsa band. The songs are pure poetry, but the distinctive Cuban rhythms propel the lyric. It’s almost impossible not to dance once the band starts playing. It’s as if the beat channels the song into your entire body. Even if you can’t speak a word of Spanish, you can hear the joy, the love of life and the passion in his voice.

 

Puentes returns to Cuba often, to touch base and to replenish the creative spark. He feels like he is an ambassador for Cuban music, but can’t really be a proper representative if he is not in touch with the current scene on the Island. There is no doubt that he is a bearer of the tradition—even giants of the genre acknowledge this. He has sung with the likes of Celia Cruz and Ruben Blades. He became lead singer to Los Angeles-based Jose Rizo’s band Mongorama and was thrilled when they earned a Grammy nomination as best tropical Latin album.

 

Another Salsa great, the legendary Oscar Hernandez, director of the Spanish Harlem Orchestra,  arranged three songs and played piano on his Adonis’ cd Sabor a Café. Oscar Hernandez’s piano solos are such a foundational element in Cuban music that they are taught in Cubas music schools.

 

Dicen, Adonis Puentes third solo recording project ,was released in March this year in Victoria, where he makes his home. This time produced by Oscar Hernandez, the recording is destined to become a classic of the genre. It’s  a sophisticated mix of elegant balladry and rumbas as sweet as they are sensual. Hernandez’s keyboard and horn charts are the perfect foundation Puentes’ velvety crooning, punctuating his romantic pleas without challenging them. As performed by his acoustic Voice of Cuba Orchestra (guitar, tres, bass, percussion, piano and trumpet), the music makes for lively performances.

 

Puentes routinely advises audiences to bring their dancing shoes to his shows, and his appearances at Summerfolk will be no exception. We are even arranging for an instructor to teach an afternoon Salas class so you’ll be completely ready to dance the night away.

 

The Summerfolk Music and Crafts Festival happens August 17, 18 and 19 at Kelso Beach Park. Information can be found at www.summerfolk.org. We hope to see you there. Don’t forget your dancing shoes!

 

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Sun Times Article 1: Waiting for Summerfolk…

Every year Artistic Director James Keelaghan writes a series of 12 articles for the Owen Sound Sun Times previewing the Summerfolk Music and Crafts Festival

By James Keelaghan

There are eighty-five days until Summerfolk.

 

Down at Kelso Beach Park, the buds are just beginning to open on the trees. The grass is turning green and the water, ice-free, is lapping at the shore. Were there security cameras installed, over the past weeks you would have noticed small groups of people with clipboards and measuring wheels roaming the grounds. You’d see a lot of pointing and scribbling and taking snapshots.

 

Eighty-five days, but we are in the park, measuring and imagining.

 

We’re imagining a park full of music and food and artisans. We’re imagining families, children, young lovers, tourists and others of all shapes, sizes and persuasions coming together for three days to share a common experience—Summerfolk.

 

Forty-three years ago this August, a group of people imagined Summerfolk into existence. Every year since then, we appear to conjure a festival out of thin air, transforming Kelso Beach Park into a place where music plays for 14 hours a day and where 4,000 people a day gather to share an experience.

 

Like Dickens’ spirits, though, Summerfolk doesn’t live for just three days. It’s a year’s worth of work. It’s May, but the performers have been booked, the food vendors and artisans selected, tents and port-a-potties ordered and the sound system reserved. Some grant applications and sponsorship deals are worked on 18 months before the current festival.

 

Every month, the Summerfolk committee meets to propose and discuss ideas and to work out logistics. We ask ourselves a lot of questions. Did we place this or that tent properly last year? What happens if we move that fence 5 feet? Is there enough power to do what we want? Do we want the tent sides with the rings so we can close the sides more quickly if it rains?

 

Right about now, the committee heads start reaching out to the over 700 volunteers who staff the various crews—construction, electrical, staging, trash and more.

 

All of that is done for a singular purpose—so that we can come together for three days and enjoy life. Music and food and art make life better. Sure we relax and soak up the sun, have a glass of wine or a beer but we also feed our minds. I sometimes walk away from a stage at Summerfolk shaking my head at the intricacy of something I heard, or a line from a song stuck in my head, or when I hear a type of music I’ve never heard before.

 

Myself, I’m deep into the scheduling of the festival. Over the past few months, I’ve whittled down hundreds of applications and sent out hundreds of offers. My wish list at the start of this process is seldom the same as the final list of performers because of several factors—fees versus our budget, availability just to name two.

 

Now that the list is done, I’m scheduling the festival I’m figuring out when each act is going to get their performance time. I’m thinking about the combination of performers for each workshop. A songwriter’s circle with Sarah Harmer, Stephen Fearing and Rose Cousins seems like a natural—as does a workshop with the Kubasonics and Polky Village Band. That’s two out of the sixty daytime slots taken care of!

 

Eighty-five days until Summerfolk.

 

You may have noticed I haven’t been saying eighty-five sleeps. There’s a good reason for that. As Summerfolk approaches, sleep time falls off as a square of the distance from today’s date to August 17. But time just keeps on rolling.

 

We’re excited about the program we’ve put together for you, from perennial children’s entertainer, Fred Penner to the incredibly soulful Tanika Charles. From a stilt-walking Maracatu band, Tallbeat, to the fresh sound of The Lifers–from the Welsh trad sensation Calan to the ever so modern Bahamas—musically there will be a lot to delight your ears. A children’s area, our signature wine bar, over 40 artisans, fantastic food–we really can’t wait.

 

But we have to.

 

Eighty-five days until Summerfolk. You can find information and links to tickets, as ever, at summerfolk.org. You’ll find us at Kelso Beach Park 17th, 18th and 19th. We look forward to showing you a good time.

 

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