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Tag Archives: Summerfolk

Georgian Bay Roots Ep 38

Georgian Bay Roots

With your host Jon Farmer


1609969_10154532318180220_5111923560966166563_nEvery Sunday on CFOS 560 from 4-5pm, Georgian Bay Roots shares some of the best music that’s made in and played in Grey and Bruce Counties with roots music from across Canada and around the world thrown into the mix. Host, Jon Farmer, brings a musician’s ear and the heart of a fan to the airwaves with stories about performers and news about upcoming shows and releases. Tune in to hear some of your favourite acts and new bands that you didn’t know you loved.

This episode is full of train songs and concert news and finishes with a song for Father’s Day.

If you missed the live show, we will post the episode by 6pm ET.

You can download an iTunes podcast here

Are you making music that you want us to share?
Do you have gig coming up that you want to promote?
Are you interested in being a sponsor or advertising on the show?
Contact us at georgianbayroots@summerfolk.org

Georgian Bay Roots is presented by the Georgian Bay Folk Society with the support the Ontario Trillium Foundation

Georgian Bay Roots is sponsored this week by:
OS_Transportation_FeaturedImage MariposaFolkFestival-LogoName-Iogo1

Maawanjiiding

GBR 38 june 18
Artist: The Duhks
Track: Lazy John
Length: 4:32
Canadian
Artist: Corin Raymond
Track: Two miles of train
Length: 4:45
Canadian
Artist: The Great Canadian Swampstompers
Track: Train Time
Length: 4:08
Canadian
Artist: Sweet Alibi
Track: Dark train
Length: 4:20
Canadian
Artist: Black Train Took My Beloved Away
Track: Turkwaz
Length: 4:05
Canadian
Artist: Richard Laviolette
Track: Oncoming Trains
Length: 1:53
Canadian
Artist: Blackburn
Track: Railroad song
Length: 3:12
Canadian
Artist: Grass Mountain hobos
Track: Hear a train
Length: 3:21
Canadian
Artist: Nancy Dutra
Track: Ride that Train
Length: 3:24
Canadian
Artist: Gordon Lightfoot
Track: Canadian Railroad Trilogy
Length: 7:07
Canadian
Artist: Matt Anderson
Track: Home Sweet Home
Length: 4:11
Canadian
Artist: Mae Trio
Track: Back to the Shore
Length: 4:29
Canadian
Artist: Bob Dylan
Track: The Girl on the Greenbriar shore
Length: 2:25
Canadian
Artist: Jenn Grant
Track: Lion With Me
Length: 3:26
Canadian

Archives

Visit our  iTunes podcast page for archived programs

Pages with set lists and further info can be found below.

GBR show 1

GBR show 2

GBR show 3

GBR show 4

GBR show 5

GBR show 6

GBR show 7

GBR show 8

GBR show 9

GBR show 10

GBR show 11

GBR show 12

GBR show 13

GBR show 14

GBR show 15

GBR show 16

GBR show 17

GBR show 18

GBR show 19

GBR show 20 – Valentine’s Day

GBR show 21

GBR show 22

GBR show 23

GBR show 24

GBR show 25

GBR show 26

GBR show 27

GBR show 28

GBR show 29 – Easter

GBR show 30

GBR show 31

GBR show 32

GBR show 33 – Mother’s Day

GBR show 34

GBR show 35

GBR show 36

GBR show 37

Georgian Bay Roots Ep 37

Georgian Bay Roots

With your host Jon Farmer


1609969_10154532318180220_5111923560966166563_nEvery Sunday on CFOS 560 from 4-5pm, Georgian Bay Roots shares some of the best music that’s made in and played in Grey and Bruce Counties with roots music from across Canada and around the world thrown into the mix. Host, Jon Farmer, brings a musician’s ear and the heart of a fan to the airwaves with stories about performers and news about upcoming shows and releases. Tune in to hear some of your favourite acts and new bands that you didn’t know you loved.

This episode is features songs about pines, homes, and a pile of concert news.

If you missed the live show, we will post the episode by 6pm ET.

You can download an iTunes podcast here

Are you making music that you want us to share?
Do you have gig coming up that you want to promote?
Are you interested in being a sponsor or advertising on the show?
Contact us at georgianbayroots@summerfolk.org

Georgian Bay Roots is presented by the Georgian Bay Folk Society with the support the Ontario Trillium Foundation

 

GBR 37 june11
Artist: The Duhks
Track: Lazy John
Length: 4:32
Canadian
Artist: Joel Plaskett
Track: Pine, Pine, Pine
Length: 2:09
Canadian
Artist: Bruce Molsky
Track: Piney Mountains
Length: 3:10
Artist: Slocan Ramblers
Track: Lone Pine
Length 3:50
Canadian
Artist: Sheesham and Lotus
Track: Cutting at the Pines
Length: 3:37
Canadian
Artist: Amanda Rheume
Track: Passed Down the Line
Length: 3:47
Canadian
Artist: Jeremy Fisher
Track: Singing on the Sidewalk
Length: 3:12
Canadian
Artist: Sarah Beatty
Track: Northern Shore
Length: 4:08
Canadian
Artist: Little Miss Higgins
Track Ferry Boat Blues
Length: 2:43
Canadian
Artist: June off of Drinkin’
Track The D Rangers
Length: 3:30
Canadian
Artist: Matt Epp
Track When You Know
Length 4:32
Canadian
Artist: Barenaked LAdies
Track Light Up My Room
Length 3:36
Canadian
Artist: Taylor Holden & the Law of Averages
Track: Home
Length 3:36
Canadian
Artist: Old Man Luedecke
Track Now We Got a Kitchen
Length: 3:18
Canadian
Artist: Anna Wiebe
Track Much Else
Length 3:53
Canadian
Artist: Sarah Macdougall and Ben Kunder
Track Better Days
Length
Canadian

Georgian Bay Roots is sponsored this week by:
OS_Transportation_FeaturedImage MariposaFolkFestival-LogoName-Iogo1

Maawanjiiding

Archives

Visit our  iTunes podcast page for archived programs

Pages with set lists and further info can be found below.

GBR show 1

GBR show 2

GBR show 3

GBR show 4

GBR show 5

GBR show 6

GBR show 7

GBR show 8

GBR show 9

GBR show 10

GBR show 11

GBR show 12

GBR show 13

GBR show 14

GBR show 15

GBR show 16

GBR show 17

GBR show 18

GBR show 19

GBR show 20 – Valentine’s Day

GBR show 21

GBR show 22

GBR show 23

GBR show 24

GBR show 25

GBR show 26

GBR show 27

GBR show 28

GBR show 29 – Easter

GBR show 30

GBR show 31

GBR show 32

GBR show 33 – Mother’s Day

GBR show 34

GBR show 35

GBR show 36

Georgian Bay Roots Ep 32

Georgian Bay Roots

With your host Jon Farmer


1609969_10154532318180220_5111923560966166563_nEvery Sunday on CFOS 560 from 4-5pm, Georgian Bay Roots shares some of the best music that’s made in and played in Grey and Bruce Counties with roots music from across Canada and around the world thrown into the mix. Host, Jon Farmer, brings a musician’s ear and the heart of a fan to the airwaves with stories about performers and news about upcoming shows and releases. Tune in to hear some of your favourite acts and new bands that you didn’t know you loved.

This week is a mixed bag of tunes with a heavy dose of fiddle in the last part of the show. We’ll take the tempo up, slow it down, pluck your heart strings, and let you know about upcoming concerts; because what else is radio for?

If you missed the live show, we will post the episode by 6pm ET.

You can download an iTunes podcast here

Are you making music that you want us to share?
Do you have gig coming up that you want to promote?
Are you interested in being a sponsor or advertising on the show?
Contact us at georgianbayroots@summerfolk.org

Georgian Bay Roots is presented by the Georgian Bay Folk Society with the support the Ontario Trillium Foundation

GBR 32
Artist: The Duhks
Track: Lazy John
Length: 4:32
Canadian
Artist: The MacKenzie Blues Band
Track: Down With Love (Slam! Bam!)
Length: 3:09
Canadian
Artist: Drew MacIver (Featuring Moonshiner’s Daughter)
Track: Suzanne
Length: 3:26
Canadian
Artist: Poor Angus
Track: How Many Are the Days
Length: 4:10
Canadian
Artist: Quartette
Track: No Place Like Home
Length: 4:12
Canadian
Artist: HIllsburn
Track: Farther in the Fire
Length: 4:19
Canadian
Artist: The Lifers
Track: Where the Smoke Blows
Length: 4:06
Canadian
Artist: Dirty Dishes
Track: Midnight Fire
Length: 3:47
Canadian
Artist: Bon Debarras
Track: Fille d’un Avocat – Brandy Calume
Length: 6:30
Canadian
Artist: Anne Lederman
Track: The Fiddler’s Alphabet / Carl’s Tunes
Length: 8:19
Canadian
Artist: Fretless
Track: Pressed for Time / Bunch of Keys
Length: 4:36
Canadian
Artist: Matt Gordon, Leonard Podolack, Bill Shanley
Track: Katie HIll
Length: Three Thin Dimes
Canadian
Artist: Jaron Freeman Fox and the Opposite of Everything
Track: The Tip of Your Lungs
Length: 4:07
Canadian
Artist: Delhi 2 Dublin
Track: Happy Ending
Length: 1:35
Canadian

Archives

Visit our  iTunes podcast page for archived programs

Pages with set lists and further info can be found below.

GBR show 1

GBR show 2

GBR show 3

GBR show 4

GBR show 5

GBR show 6

GBR show 7

GBR show 8

GBR show 9

GBR show 10

GBR show 11

GBR show 12

GBR show 13

GBR show 14

GBR show 15

GBR show 16

GBR show 17

GBR show 18

GBR show 19

GBR show 20 – Valentine’s Day

GBR show 21

GBR show 22

GBR show 23

GBR show 24

GBR show 25

GBR show 26

GBR show 27

GBR show 28

GBR show 29 – Easter

GBR show 30

GBR show 31

Georgian Bay Roots Ep 28

Georgian Bay Roots

With your host Jon Farmer


1609969_10154532318180220_5111923560966166563_nEvery Sunday on CFOS 560 from 4-5pm, Georgian Bay Roots shares some of the best music that’s made in and played in Grey and Bruce Counties with roots music from across Canada and around the world thrown into the mix. Host, Jon Farmer, brings a musician’s ear and the heart of a fan to the airwaves with stories about performers and news about upcoming shows and releases. Tune in to hear some of your favourite acts and new bands that you didn’t know you loved.

This week we’re showcasing a few handfuls of local bands and musicians including acts from Summerfolk’s Youth Discovery series.

If you missed the live show, we will post the episode by 6pm ET.

You can download an iTunes podcast here

Are you making music that you want us to share?
Do you have gig coming up that you want to promote?
Are you interested in being a sponsor or advertising on the show?
Contact us at georgianbayroots@summerfolk.org

Georgian Bay Roots is presented by the Georgian Bay Folk Society with the support the Ontario Trillium Foundation


GBR April 9
Artist: The Duhks
Track: Lazy John
Album: Beyond the Blue
Length: 4:32
Canadian
Artist: Richard Laviolette
Track: Grey Rain
Length: 4:33
Canadian
Artist: William Prince
Track: Eddy Boy
Length: 4:28
Canadian
Artist: Gillian Welch
Track: I Had a Real Good Mother and Father
Length: 3:14
Artist: Bruce Cockburn
Track: Foxglove
Length: 1:27
Canadian
Artist: Sarah Harmer
Track: Uniform Grey
Length: 3:43
Canadian
Artist: Clarissa Fortin
Track: The Bridge
Length: 4:01
Canadian
Artist: John Muirhead
Track: Days Don’t Fade
Length: 4:20
Canadian
Artist: Lauren Best
Track: zeropointfive
Length: 2:35
Canadian
Artist: First Rate People
Track: Red Arcade
Length: 3:03
Canadian
Artist: The Lifers
Track: Home for the Weekend
Length: 4:00
Canadian
Artist: Dave Hawkins
Track: Children Stand Up
Length: 3:25
Canadian
Artist Jaret Koop
Track Ain’t That the Way
Length 4:34
Canadian
Artist The MacKenzie Blues Band
Track Sweet Stuff
Length 2:52
Canadian
Artist Shakura S’Aida
Track Bring Me Back
Length 3:23
Canadian
Artist Ian Tamblyn
Track Favourite Time of the Year
Length 2:23
Canadian

Archives

Visit our  iTunes podcast page for archived programs

Pages with set lists and further info can be found below.

GBR show 1

GBR show 2

GBR show 3

GBR show 4

GBR show 5

GBR show 6

GBR show 7

GBR show 8

GBR show 9

GBR show 10

GBR show 11

GBR show 12

GBR show 13

GBR show 14

GBR show 15

GBR show 16

GBR show 17

GBR show 18

GBR show 19

GBR show 20 – Valentine’s Day

GBR show 21

GBR show 22

GBR show 23

GBR show 24

GBR show 25

GBR show 26

Georgian Bay Roots Ep 27

Georgian Bay Roots

With your host Jon Farmer


1609969_10154532318180220_5111923560966166563_nEvery Sunday on CFOS 560 from 4-5pm, Georgian Bay Roots shares some of the best music that’s made in and played in Grey and Bruce Counties with roots music from across Canada and around the world thrown into the mix. Host, Jon Farmer, brings a musician’s ear and the heart of a fan to the airwaves with stories about performers and news about upcoming shows and releases. Tune in to hear some of your favourite acts and new bands that you didn’t know you loved.

This week we’re showcasing songs abut keepers, keeping, and the things we keep.

If you missed the live show, we will post the episode by 6pm ET.

You can download an iTunes podcast here

Are you making music that you want us to share?
Do you have gig coming up that you want to promote?
Are you interested in being a sponsor or advertising on the show?
Contact us at georgianbayroots@summerfolk.org

Georgian Bay Roots is presented by the Georgian Bay Folk Society with the support the Ontario Trillium Foundation


GBR April 2
Artist: The Duhks
Track: Lazy John
Album: Beyond the Blue
Length: 4:32
Canadian
Artist: Busby Marou
Track: Keep Me
Length: 3:38
Artist: The Mae Trio
Track: Yours for the Keeping
Length: 4:50
Artist: Ken Yates
Track: Keep Your Head Down
Length: 3:20
Canadian
Artist: Sherman Downey
Track: Keep Your Head up
Length: 4:23
Canadian
Artist: Sing Along Tim and the Pacifiers
Track: I Can’t Keep My Eyes Open
Length: 2:23
Canadian
Artist: Sweet Alibi
Track: Keep Showing You
Length: 3:05
Canadian
Artist: John Gorka
Track: The Lock Keeper
Length: 4:45
Artist: Catherine MacLellan
Track: Keep On Fighting
Length: 5:19
Canadian
Artist: The Shards
Track: Keeper of the Flame
Length: 3:52
Canadian
Artist: Steve Gates
Track: Keepin’ People Out
Length: 2:33
Canadian
Artist: Corb Lund
Track: Always Keep an Edge on Your Knife
Length: 3:16
Canadian
Artist: Jim Byrnes
Track: Didn’t it Rain
Length: 4:38
Canadian
Artist: Modabo
Track: Sargasso
Length: 2:57
Canadian
Artist: Don Ross
Track: A Million Brazillian Civillians
Length: 3:21
Canadian

Archives

Visit our  iTunes podcast page for archived programs

Pages with set lists and further info can be found below.

GBR show 1

GBR show 2

GBR show 3

GBR show 4

GBR show 5

GBR show 6

GBR show 7

GBR show 8

GBR show 9

GBR show 10

GBR show 11

GBR show 12

GBR show 13

GBR show 14

GBR show 15

GBR show 16

GBR show 17

GBR show 18

GBR show 19

GBR show 20 – Valentine’s Day

GBR show 21

GBR show 22

GBR show 23

GBR show 24

GBR show 25

GBR show 26

Georgian Bay Roots Ep 026

Georgian Bay Roots

With your host Jon Farmer


1609969_10154532318180220_5111923560966166563_nEvery Sunday on CFOS 560 from 4-5pm, Georgian Bay Roots shares some of the best music that’s made in and played in Grey and Bruce Counties with roots music from across Canada and around the world thrown into the mix. Host, Jon Farmer, brings a musician’s ear and the heart of a fan to the airwaves with stories about performers and news about upcoming shows and releases. Tune in to hear some of your favourite acts and new bands that you didn’t know you loved.

This week we’re showcasing artists on the line up of this year’s Summerfolk Music and Crafts Festival. If you’re on this website I bet you already know how great it is but these songs will get you even more excited.

If you missed the live show, we will post the episode by 6pm ET.

You can download an iTunes podcast here

Are you making music that you want us to share?
Do you have gig coming up that you want to promote?
Are you interested in being a sponsor or advertising on the show?
Contact us at georgianbayroots@summerfolk.org

Georgian Bay Roots is presented by the Georgian Bay Folk Society with the support the Ontario Trillium Foundation


GBR March 19
Artist: The Duhks
Track: Lazy John
Album: Beyond the Blue
Length: 4:32
Release date: 2014
Canadian
Artist: Bill and Joel Plaskett
Track: The Next Blue Sky
Length: 3:50
Canadian
Artist: Treasa Levasseur
Track: Talk to me Babe
Length: 4:11
Canadian
Artist: Matt Epp
Track: Aftermath
Length: 4:25
Canadian
Artist: Ken Yates
Track: High on You Under the Moon
Length: 4:10
Canadian
Artist: Murder Murder
Track: When the Lord Calls Your Name
Length: 5:16
Canadian
Artist: Korrontzi
Track: Sardos K
Length: 4:08
Artist: Turkwaz
Track: Love on a Rainy Day
Length: 4:53
Canadian

Artist: the Friends of Fiddler’s Green
Track: The Reason Why
Length: 4:17
Canadian
Artist: The Good Lovelies
Track: Cheek to Cheek
Length: 3:02
Canadian
Artist: Jimmy Pearson
Track: Bruised
Length: 3:30
Canadian
Artist: Lynn Miles
Track: Fearless Heart
Length: 3:42
Canadian
Artist: Jon Jasper-Lawless and Linsey Beckett
Track: So Sure
Length: 2:07
Canadian
Artist: Andrea Ramolo
Track: Chameleon
Length: 3:14
Canadian
Artist: Andrea Ramolo
Track: Caruso
Length: 3:46
Canadian

Archives

Visit our  iTunes podcast page for archived programs

Or stream them on Soundcloud here

Pages with set lists and further info can be found below.

GBR show 1

GBR show 2

GBR show 3

GBR show 4

GBR show 5

GBR show 6

GBR show 7

GBR show 8

GBR show 9

GBR show 10

GBR show 11

GBR show 12

GBR show 13

GBR show 14

GBR show 15

GBR show 16

GBR show 17

GBR show 18

GBR show 19

GBR show 20 – Valentine’s Day

GBR show 21

GBR show 22

GBR show 23

GBR show 24

GBR show 25

Georgian Bay Roots Ep 24

Georgian Bay Roots

With your host Jon Farmer


1609969_10154532318180220_5111923560966166563_nEvery Sunday on CFOS 560 from 4-5pm, Georgian Bay Roots shares some of the best music that’s made in and played in Grey and Bruce Counties with roots music from across Canada and around the world thrown into the mix. Host, Jon Farmer, brings a musician’s ear and the heart of a fan to the airwaves with stories about performers and news about upcoming shows and releases. Tune in to hear some of your favourite acts and new bands that you didn’t know you loved.

This week we’re starting with a handful of spring songs in honour of the unseasonably warm weather over the past few weeks,  there are some fun tunes and concert news in the middle, and a feature interview with Winnipeg band Roger Roger in the last third of the show.

If you missed the live show, we will post the episode by 6pm ET.

You can download an iTunes podcast here

Are you making music that you want us to share?
Do you have gig coming up that you want to promote?
Are you interested in being a sponsor or advertising on the show?
Contact us at georgianbayroots@summerfolk.org

Georgian Bay Roots is presented by the Georgian Bay Folk Society with the support the Ontario Trillium Foundation

 

Here’s the full interview with Roger Roger

 

GBR 23 March 5
Artist: The Duhks
Track: Lazy John
Album: Beyond the Blue
Length: 4:32
Release date: 2014
Canadian
Artist: Joe Grass
Track: Spring Wonder
Length: 3:18
Album: Joe Grass
Canadian
Artist: Graham Wardrop
Track: Signs of Spring
Length: 4:02
Album: Speed of Love
Artist: Anna Janelle
Track: Captive of Spring
Length: 2:55
Album: So Long at the Fair
Canadian
Artist: Amy Carson Hunter
Track: Cold Day For Spring
Length: 3:54
Album: Bare Demos
Canadian
Artist: Joy Kills Sorrow
Track: Spring
Length: 3:48
Album: Joy Kills Sorrow
Artist: Glenna Garramone
Track: Maple Syrup
Length: 4:09
Album: Seasky-Starsong
Canadian
Artist: Red Molly
Track: The Last Call
Length: 4:16
Album: James
Artist: Marshall Veroni
Track: I Used to Walk
Length: 5:00
Canadian
Artist: The Allen Family Reunion
Track: Sleepy Eyed John / Tom and Jerry
Length: 2:59
Album: The Allen Family Reunion
Canadian
Artist: Roger Roger
Track: Another Girl’s Shoes
Length: 3:18
Album: Fairweather
Canadian
Artist: Roger Roger
Track: Dead Horse Creek
Length: 2:55
Album: Fairweather
Canadian
Artist: Cara Luft
Track: There’s a Train
Length: 4:41
Album: The Light Fantastic
Canadian

Artist: MAZ
Track: Reel Fontaine
Length: 3:01
Canadian

Archives

Visit our  iTunes podcast page for archived programs

Or stream them on Soundcloud here

Pages with set lists and further info can be found below.

GBR show 1

GBR show 2

GBR show 3

GBR show 4

GBR show 5

GBR show 6

GBR show 7

GBR show 8

GBR show 9

GBR show 10

GBR show 11

GBR show 12

GBR show 13

GBR show 14

GBR show 15

GBR show 16

GBR show 17

GBR show 18

GBR show 19

GBR show 20 – Valentine’s Day

GBR show 21

GBR show 22

GBR show 23

Georgian Bay Roots Ep 023

Georgian Bay Roots

With your host Jon Farmer


1609969_10154532318180220_5111923560966166563_nEvery Sunday on CFOS 560 from 4-5pm, Georgian Bay Roots shares some of the best music that’s made in and played in Grey and Bruce Counties with roots music from across Canada and around the world thrown into the mix. Host, Jon Farmer, brings a musician’s ear and the heart of a fan to the airwaves with stories about performers and news about upcoming shows and releases. Tune in to hear some of your favourite acts and new bands that you didn’t know you loved.

This week’s episode features a whole cycle of moon songs, songs from performers with upcoming concerts, a couple grin songs, and some songs about trains.

If you missed the live show, we will post the episode by 6pm ET.

You can download an iTunes podcast here

Are you making music that you want us to share?
Do you have gig coming up that you want to promote?
Are you interested in being a sponsor or advertising on the show?
Contact us at georgianbayroots@summerfolk.org

Georgian Bay Roots is presented by the Georgian Bay Folk Society with the support the Ontario Trillium Foundation

This week’s episode is brought to you in part by:

carrot logo

GBR 23 March 5
Artist: The Duhks
Track: Lazy John
Album: Beyond the Blue
Length: 4:32
Release date: 2014
Canadian
Artist Sarah Harmer
Track: Blue Moon of Kentucky
Length 2:07
Canadian
Artist: James Hill
Track: New Moon
Length: 3:49
Canadian
Artist: Corey Heuval
Track: Pray For the Moon
Length: 4:37
Canadian
Artist: Abigail Lappel
Track: Full Moon
Length: 2:32
Canadian
Artist: Braden Phelan
Track: A Closer Moon
Length: 4:24
Canadian
Artist: Katie Melua
Track: Thank You, Stars
Length 3:39
Artist: Laurence Stevenson
Track: Playford Tunes
Length: 3:24
Canadian
Artist: Morgan Barrie
Track: Zombies
Length: 3:33
Canadian
Artist: Pat Maloney
Track: More to Love
Length: 2:49
Canadian
Artist: Greg Smith
Track: Who She Was
Length: 2:25
Canadian
Artist: Kaia Kater
Track: Petit Chagrin
Length: 3:09
Canadian
Artist: Kelly Prescott
Track: Grin and Wear It
Length: 3:13
Canadian
Artist: Allison Brown
Track: Model Railroad Town
Length: 2:18
Canadian
Artist: Matt Tomlinson
Track: Evening Train
Length: 2:28
Canadian
Artist: Diana Braithwaite
Track: Train
Length: 3:42
Canadian
Artist: Murder Murder
Track: Movin On
Length: 2:56
Canadian
Artist: Laurence Stevenson
Track: Schottische Norbotten
Length: 3:24
Canadian

Archives

Visit our  iTunes podcast page for archived programs

Or stream them on Soundcloud here

Pages with set lists and further info can be found below.

GBR show 1

GBR show 2

GBR show 3

GBR show 4

GBR show 5

GBR show 6

GBR show 7

GBR show 8

GBR show 9

GBR show 10

GBR show 11

GBR show 12

GBR show 13

GBR show 14

GBR show 15

GBR show 16

GBR show 17

GBR show 18

GBR show 19

GBR show 20 – Valentine’s Day

GBR show 21

GBR show 22

Georgian Bay Roots Episode 19 – The Mid-Winter Blues Show

Georgian Bay Roots

With your host Jon Farmer


jonfarmerEvery Sunday on CFOS 560 from 4-5pm, Georgian Bay Roots shares some of the best music that’s made in and played in Grey and Bruce Counties with roots music from across Canada and around the world thrown into the mix. Host, Jon Farmer, brings a musician’s ear and the heart of a fan to the airwaves with stories about performers and news about upcoming shows and releases. Tune in to hear some of your favourite acts and new bands that you didn’t know you loved.

This is the mid-winter blues episode with some classic blues, and a mix of Canadian and local blues to help you get through what can be a cold and dreary time of year. We’ve also got part of a conversation  with Ken Whiteley from Summerfolk last August

If you missed the live show, we will post the episode by 6pm ET.

You can download an iTunes podcast here

Are you making music that you want us to share?
Do you have gig coming up that you want to promote?
Are you interested in being a sponsor or advertising on the show?
Contact us at georgianbayroots@summerfolk.org

Georgian Bay Roots is presented by the Georgian Bay Folk Society with the support the Ontario Trillium Foundation


Ep 19 The Blues
Artist: The Duhks
Track: Lazy John
Album: Beyond the Blue
Length: 4:32
Release date: 2014
Canadian
Artist: Robert Johnson
Track: Cross Road Blues
Length: 2:40
Artist: Pharis and Jason Romero
Track: Truck Driver’s Blues
Length: 2:05
Canadian
Artist: Barrel Boys
Track: Housebound Blues
Length: 3:48
Canadian
Artist: Michael Jerome Browne
Track: Broke Down Engine
Length: 4:17
Canadian
Artist: The MacKenzie Blues Band
Track: Move On
Length: 3:58
Canadian
Artist: Ken Whiteley
Track: Freedom Blues
Length: 5:00
Canadian

Artist: Scarlett, Washington, and Whiteley
Track: A Little Street Where Old Friends Meet
Length: 3:47
Canadian
Artist: Jackie Washington
Track: I Ain’t Got You
Length: 2:15
Canadian
Artist: David Francey
Track: American Blues
Length: 3:50
Canadian
Artist: Rick Fines and Suzie Vinnick
Track: How’d You Know I Missed You
Length: 3:17
Canadian
Artist: 24th Street Wailers
Track: Unshakeable
Length: 4:02
Canadian
Artist: Molly Johnson
Track: Night Comes In
Length: 4:45
Canadian
Artist: 12 Below Zero
Track: Highway 21
Length: 4:00
Canadian

Archives

Visit our  iTunes podcast page for archived programs

Or stream them on Soundcloud here

Pages with set lists and further info can be found below.

GBR show 1

GBR show 2

GBR show 3

GBR show 4

GBR show 5

GBR show 6

GBR show 7

GBR show 8

GBR show 9

GBR show 10

GBR show 11

GBR show 12

GBR show 13

GBR show 14

GBR show 15

GBR show 16

GBR show 17

GBR show 18

Georgian Bay Roots 13

Georgian Bay Roots

With your host Jon Farmer


jonfarmerEvery Sunday on CFOS 560 from 4-5pm, Georgian Bay Roots shares some of the best music that’s made in and played in Grey and Bruce Counties with roots music from across Canada and around the world thrown into the mix. Host, Jon Farmer, brings a musician’s ear and the heart of a fan to the airwaves with stories about performers and news about upcoming shows and releases. Tune in to hear some of your favourite acts and new bands that you didn’t know you loved.

This week’s show features a couple of songs in commemoration of December 6th, The National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women.

If you missed the live show, we will post the episode by 6pm ET.

You can download an iTunes podcast here

Are you making music that you want us to share?
Are you interested in being a sponsor or advertising on the show?
Contact us at georgianbayroots@summerfolk.org

Georgian Bay Roots is presented by the Georgian Bay Folk Society with the support the Ontario Trillium Foundation


Ep 013 Dec 4
Artist: The Duhks
Track: Lazy John
Album: Beyond the Blue
Length: 30
Release date: 2014
Canadian
Artist: Pretty Archie
Track Scars
Album North End Sky
Length 3:24
Year 2011
Canadian
Artist: Hot Black Coffee
Track Get in Line
Album unknown
Length 3:22
Year 2016
Canadian
Artist: MAZ
Track Reel du Combat
Album Telescope
Length 4:13
Year 2011
Canadian
Artist: Canailles
Track J’l’hais
Album Manger du Bois
Length 3:50
Year unknown
Canadian
Artist: The Jerry Cans
Track Qanuinngittuq
Album Aakuluk
Length 4:19
Year 2014
Canadian
Artist: Pharis and Jason Romero
Track Sad Old Song
Album Long Gone Out West Blues
Length 3:54
Year 2013
Canadian
Artist: David Ross Macdonald
Track We Don’t Live Forever
Album Knuckle Brass and Bone
Length 4:34
Year 2006
Artist: Chuck Ragan and Austin Lucas
Track Sun or Snow
Album Bristle Ridge
Length 5:26
Year 2008
Artist: Samantha Martin and the Haggard
Track Dark Angel
Album Samantha Maritin & the Haggard
Length 3:13
Year 2011
Canadian
Artist: Evalyn Parry
Track 14 (For December 6)
Album Small Theatres
Length 4:19
Year 2007
Canadian
Artist: Shawna Caspi
Track Not So Silent
Album Apartment For Lovers
Length 4:44
Year 2014
Canadian
Artist: Red Moon Road
Track I’ll Bend But I Won’t Break
Album Sorrows and Glories
Length 3:16
Year 2015
Canadian
Artist: The Boxcar Boys
Track You Are My Sunshine
Album Rye Whiskey
Length 3:19
Year 2012
Canadian

 

Archives

Visit our  iTunes podcast page for archived programs

Or stream them on Soundcloud here

Pages with set lists and further info can be found below.

GBR show 1

GBR show 2

GBR show 3

GBR show 4

GBR show 5

GBR show 6

GBR show 7

GBR show 8

GBR show 9

GBR show 10

GBR show 11

GBR show 12

Georgian Bay Roots 12

Georgian Bay Roots

With your host Jon Farmer


jonfarmerEvery Sunday on CFOS 560 from 4-5pm, Georgian Bay Roots shares some of the best music that’s made in and played in Grey and Bruce Counties with roots music from across Canada and around the world thrown into the mix. Host, Jon Farmer, brings a musician’s ear and the heart of a fan to the airwaves with stories about performers and news about upcoming shows and releases. Tune in to hear some of your favourite acts and new bands that you didn’t know you loved.

If you missed the live show, we will post the episode by 6pm ET.

You can download an iTunes podcast here

Interested in being a sponsor or advertising on the show?  contact us at georgianbayroots@summerfolk.org

Georgian Bay Roots is presented by the Georgian Bay Folk Society with the support the Ontario Trillium Foundation

 


EP 12 Nov 27
Artist: The Duhks
Track: Lazy John
Album: Beyond the Blue
Length: 30
Release date: 2014
Canadian
Artist: Julian Taylor Band
Track: Do You Remember
Album: Tech Noir
4:48
Canadian
Artist: Lindy Vopnfjord
Track: Leaves of Autumn
Album: Frozen in Time
3:01
2016
Artist: Kim and Reggie Harris
Track: Look Em In the Eye
Album: Resurrection Day
4:10
2012
Artist:Matt Gordan,Leonard Track: Podolak,Bill Shanley
Barlow Knife / Forked Deer
Album: Three Thin Dimes
4:12
2013
Artist: Anne Walker
Track: You Can’t Beat Jennie at Crokinole
Album: Down the Horseshoe Valley Road
2:38
Canadian
Artist: Willie Stratton
Track: Lonesome Rambler
Album: Della Rose
2005
4:10
Canadian
Artist: Kayla Luky
Track: Comfort and Wrong
Album: Back to Dirt
3:30
2017
Canadian
Artist: Ruth Moody
Track: One and Only
Album: These Wilder Things
4:55
2013
Canadian
Artist: Gathering Sparks
Track: Do You Want to Get Married
Album: Gathering Sparks
2:57
2014
Canadian
Artist: Coig
Track: Oak Tree Set
Album: Five
4:01
2014
Canadian
Artist: Aengus Finnan
Track: Lightfoot
Album: Once Upon A Time
5:06
2013
Canadian
Artist: Sam Lee and Friends
Track: Willie O
Album: The Fade in Time
5:15
2015
Artist: Shred Kelly
Track: White River
Album: In the Hills
4:29
Canadian

 

Archives

Visit our  iTunes podcast page for archived programs

Or stream them on Soundcloud here

Pages with set lists and further info can be found below.

GBR show 1

GBR show 2

GBR show 3

GBR show 4

GBR show 5

GBR show 6

GBR show 7

GBR show 8

GBR show 9

GBR show 10

GBR show 11

Georgian Bay Roots 11

Georgian Bay Roots

With your host Jon Farmer


jonfarmerEvery Sunday on CFOS 560 from 4-5pm, Georgian Bay Roots shares some of the best music that’s made in and played in Grey and Bruce Counties with roots music from across Canada and around the world thrown into the mix. Host, Jon Farmer, brings a musician’s ear and the heart of a fan to the airwaves with stories about performers and news about upcoming shows and releases. Tune in to hear some of your favourite acts and new bands that you didn’t know you loved.

If you missed the live show, we will post the episode by 6pm ET.

You can download an iTunes podcast here

Interested in being a sponsor or advertising on the show?  contact us at georgianbayroots@summerfolk.org

Georgian Bay Roots is presented by the Georgian Bay Folk Society with the support the Ontario Trillium Foundation

EP 11 11/20/2016
Artist: The Duhks
Track: Lazy John
Album: Beyond the Blue
Length: 30
Release date: 2014
Canadian
Artist: Matt AndeMatt Andersonrson
Track: Fired Up
Album: Coal Mining Blues
Length: 3:45
Release date: 2013
Canadian
Artist: Scott Nolan
Track: Fire Up
Album: SilverHill
Length: 4:41
Release date: 2016
Canadian
Artist: Jenn Grant
Track: Fireflies
Album: Echoes
Length: 4:01
Release date: 2009
Canadian
Artist: The Barrel Boys
Track: Something To Do With Fireflies
Album: Early On
Length: 3:05
Release date: 2014
Canadian
Artist: Sons of Perry
Track: Fireflies
Album: ?
Length: 2:55
Release date: ?
Canadian
Artist: Lemon Bucket Orkestra
Track: Tomu Kosa
Album: Cheeky
Length: 3:52
Release date: 2011
Canadian
Artist: Benjamin Dakota Rogers
Track: Whisky and Pine
Album: Whisky and Pine
Length: 4:49
Release date: 2016
Canadian
Artist: Tragedy Ann
Track: Velcro
Album: Stumbling
Length: 2:32
Release date: 2016
Canadian
Artist: Missy Bauman
Track: Her
Album: Her
Length: 3:39
Release date: 2016
Canadian
Artist: Irish Mythen
Track: How Do You Love
Album: Irish Mythen
Length: 3:59
Release date: 2014
Canadian
Artist: Leonard Cohen
Track: Tower of Song
Album: The Essential Leonard Cohen
Length: 5:37
Release date: 2002
Canadian
Artist: Jeff Buckley
Track: Hellelujah
Album: GRace
Length: 6:53
Release date: 2004
Artist: the Once
Track: Anthem
Album: The Once
Length: 5:18
Release date: ?
Canadian

Archives

Visit our  iTunes podcast page for archived programs

Or stream them on Soundcloud here

Pages with set lists and further info can be found below.

GBR show 1

GBR show 2

GBR show 3

GBR show 4

GBR show 5

GBR show 6

GBR show 7

GBR show 8

GBR show 9

GBR show 10

Irish-Mythen-High-Res--web-crop

Honestly Unforgettable Performers

By James Keelaghan
Sometimes an artist owns a song. Chances are they didn’t write it, but it’s their voice that you hear when you imagine the song being sung. Judy Garland—no one since has owned Over the Rainbow. Arlo Guthrie still has the definitive version of City of New Orleans.

Sometimes, you witness a hand off — that moment when one artist takes possession from the previous owner.

Since Irish Mythen and I share a bit of heritage, I have a confession to make. The first time I actually heard her, rather than just hearing about her, was at last year’s Folk Music Ontario conference. I walked in on the last song of one of her showcases. She ended the set with The Auld Triangle. The song was written by legendary Irish poet/playwright Brendan Behan, though the rumour persists that it was actually written by his brother, Dominic. The song has been owned since the 60s by Luke Kelly, the gravel-voiced singer for the band, The Dubliners. Shane MacGowan, of the Pogues, covered it in the 80s, but never really owned it.

Irish-Mythen-High-Res--web-crop

Irish Mythen

When Irish Mythen started singing it, I did a subconscious eye roll. So many have attempted the song. So many have failed to do it justice. By the second line of the song, however, my hair was on end. By the time she finished, it was clear the song had a new owner. It was like the spirit of Behan and Kelly had descended from the sky and placed their fingers on her.

Irish is a powerhouse. If you combined the output of every generating station in North America, it would still not come close to matching the energy in her voice. It’s a voice built to silence a Dublin pub.

I’ve gone out of my way to see Irish several times since that conference. I have rarely seen a performer more in command of herself or her audience. The darkness of some of the material is tempered by a between-song personality marked by deep humour and a sharp, quick wit.

She is not just a voice. She was named SOCAN’s songwriter of the year in 2015. She has the Irish gift for a turn of phrase. She speaks her mind and the songs can be pointed or poignant as the occasion dictates.

What Irish Mythen has in spades is honesty. It’s the hallmark of all great performers and contrary to the old adage, it can’t be faked. Old Man Luedecke has the same quality, though he and Irish have distinctly different personas.

Music conferences can open a window on a performer’s stagecraft, but they can also let you have a more intimate glimpse of a performer’s personality. I was at the Folk Alliance conference last February in Kansas City. Nice though the hotel was, after a couple of days I had to get out of the conference atmosphere and get some real food. When you are in Kansas City, the real food is barbecue.

Fortunately, not far from the hotel, was the famous Jack Stack restaurant. I was standing in the lobby looking at a map when I saw Chris Luedecke. I asked if he would like to join me, as he had a hungry look about him.

We had a pleasant walk, but when we got to the place, it was jam-packed. The hostess mentioned that there was takeout at the back. That’s how Chris and I ended up eating a mass of burnt ends (you’ll have to trust me) under a bridge beside the railway tracks.

I have rarely had a better meal—it wasn’t just the food, it was the company. Chris is down to earth and although soft spoken, he has an easy humour and is a great conversationalist. You would be hard pressed to pick him out of a crowd, but there is no mistaking him on stage.

Old_Man_Luedecke_Photo1 web edit

Old Man Luedecke

Chris writes about ordinary lives, but does it with extraordinary insight. He captures the everyday with such truth that you can’t help but see yourself in his lyrics. When I listen to an Old Man Luedeke song, my first thought is always, “I wish I’d written that.” I think that not because I am jealous of his writing, but because he is saying the things that I think, but never put into words.

His power is simplicity—a voice, a banjo—mostly—and some lyrics. With that, he creates an entire world. He seems like a modern day Pete Seeger, but where Seeger was earnest, Luedecke is laid back. There are no big issues, just small moments illuminating truth.

His is the kind of music that sneaks up on you. The first time you watch one of his shows, there is a pleasure that washes over you, some laughs, a knowing nod of the head, a hint of a tear. It’s not until a day or two after that you realize you have witnessed something extraordinary. It happens as you find yourself singing lyrics that you have only heard once. It’s the second time you see him that it really hits home. You hang on every note and every perfectly placed word resonates.

Folk music is about truth and honesty. We are pleased to present two of the most honest performers you will ever meet- Irish Mythen and Old Man Luedeke at this year’s Summerfolk Music and Crafts Festival, August 19, 20 and 21st at Kelso Beach Park in Owen Sound. Find out everything you need to know at summerfolk.org.

big tent

Where the music happens

By James Keelaghan

When you talk about folk festivals, music is essential, but really it’s all about the space.

In 1992, I played the Tønder Festival in Denmark for the first time. That festival was a week after the Lunenburg Folk Harbour Festival in Nova Scotia, so rather than go home to Calgary in between, I went directly to Denmark. I hung out in Copenhagen for a few days and then went down to Tønder.Main-Telt-Tonder

It’s a small town — 6,000 people at most, but tens of thousands descend on it for a weekend of music.The town doesn’t have a concert facility for that large a crowd and so, in a square on a field at the edge of town, they set up two circus tents. One holds about 3,500 people and the other 1,500.

After I’d spent half a day seeing everything I could see in the town, I went to the festival office and asked if there was anything I could do to pitch in. They looked at me sideways and then gave me to a guy named Neils. He took me to the bigger of the two tents and I spent a pleasant day tying off the acoustic baffling that would be hoisted into the roof of the tent.

The tent was amazing! It was completely empty with no seating. The stage and sound gear hadn’t been installed. It was just a big canvas shell.Over the next two days, crews transformed it into concert hall. It was beautifully lit, had great sight Main Stage Telt 1lines and a powerful, well run sound system.

Ever since then, I have had my eye on the spaces that music happens in. A well thought-out site with great well-run venues are essential for a successful event.

One of the undoubted stars of Summerfolk last year was the new Down by the Bay tent. Since starting as Artistic Director of Summerfolk, I’ve wanted to bring in some clear span tents. I’ve seen them, and performed in them, at festivals in Europe and Australia but have never encountered them at a Canadian folk festival.

It’s taller and more open than the tent we used for years in that space. That’s because it has no interior poles. The structure of the tent makes it easier to hang lights meaning that we can light the roof of the tent and the stage without bringing in additional scaffolding. The result is a space that inspires and welcomes. It transforms the space into a proper concert hall.

big tent

Looking into the Down By the Bay tent.

I really wanted to have the tent in our licensed area. Veterans of the festival call it the “Beer” tent. We call it the “Down By the Bay” tent because “Beer” tent just doesn’t reflect all that goes on in that space. It’s a place for high-energy music — just ask anyone who danced to Delhi 2 Dublin or The Mackenzie Blues Band last year.

20150823-1073 d2d in beer

Delhi2Dublin inspired a high energy dance party Down By the Bay at Summerfolk40

It allows for incredibly intimate moments as well. Last year’s “Tall Tales” workshop with David Francey, Steve Poltz and Donovan Woods brought the house down. During the songs, you could have heard a pint glass drop, it was so quiet.

20150822-0546 poltz in beer tent

Steve Poltz performs Down By the Bay

On the Saturday of the festival, activity in the tent starts at about 9 AM as the stage crews arrive to ring out the sound system and prep the stage. Music starts at 11AM and runs straight through until until 1AM -– with the exception of a quiet hour between 6 and 7 so the crew can get dinner. Last year, on Saturday, twenty-seven acts played on the stage in fourteen hours.

We’ll do pretty much the same this year. One highlight will be Bruce Cockburn playing an afternoon workshop with Leonard Sumner and Lindi Ortega. On Sunday the tent will host an east coast kitchen party with Natalie McMaster, The East Pointers and Cassie and Maggie Macdonald. On both Friday and Saturday nights, the evenings traditionally end with sets that blow the roof off. This year, Blackburn, Gypsy Kumbia Orchestra and My Son The Hurricane will do the honours.

Down By the Bay has evolved into a second main stage at the festival. This year, by adding another section to the tent, we can have close to a thousand people under cover.

We now have the audience under cover at five of the six daytime stages. That’s not just because we want folks dry in case of rain.

The fact is, recently we have had more sunshine than rain at Summerfolk. In the past four festivals, we have only had one day of rain. The sun is becoming a concern for a lot of people and a shady place to listen to music is a great thing on hot summer afternoon.

We don’t worry about the sun as much at the other mainstage — the Amphitheatre.

Digging Roots led a round dance in the Amphitheatre on Sunday night

Digging Roots led a round dance in the Amphitheatre on Sunday night

That’s because we only run that stage at night. For the first few years of Summerfolk, the area where the amphitheatre is now was just a broad field. The amphitheatre was built in 1982. For 35 years, it’s hosted thousands of performers.

The stage, of course, is named after the late, lamented and much loved Stan Rogers Summerfolk loved Stan and he loved it back, setting the pattern for a relationship many performers have with Summerfolk.

An amphitheatre is not unique. What makes ours special is the backdrop. It’s a combination of sky, water, trees and a hint of the industrial.  It’s easily one of the most beautiful backdrops of any festival in Canada.

You can enjoy our Summerfolk space at Kelso Beach Park on August 19, 20 and 21 this year.Advance tickets are on sale until July 31st and information can be found at summerfolk.org.

Wanted: Artistic Director’s Assistant

JOB POSTING

The Georgian Bay Folk Society (GBFS) is seeking applications for the position of Artistic Director’s Assistant. Applicants must be students returning to full time studies in the fall of 2016. The successful applicant will work under the direction of the Artistic Director and Promotions Coordinator to fulfill various duties including but not limited to:

• coordinating, collecting, and managing logistics and information related to performer orientation packages and accommodations
• liaising with performers, hospitality volunteers, and technical crews
• co-managing social media accounts and promotions
• distributing promotional materials
• other tasks as assigned within the GBFS office
• tasks as assigned at the Summerfolk Music and Crafts Festival

The successful applicant will:

• be highly motivated, organized, self-directed, and flexible
• be fully fluent and literate in English
• have a strong working knowledge of word processing and spreadsheet software
• be familiar with various social media platforms
• be comfortable working and communicating with volunteers, members of the public, and the GBFS team
• have a valid driver’s license
• be passionate about music
• work well in fast changing and busy environments

Preference will be given to applicants who:

• are bilingual
• have previous event coordination experience
• have graphic design experience
• have a vehicle

The Artistic Director’s Assistant position will run from June 29th – August 24th, 2016 working flexible hours that total to an average of 30hrs/week.

The Georgian Bay Folk Society is an equal opportunity employer. We encourage all interested applicants to submit resumes and cover letters electronically to gbfssummerfolk@gmail.com with the subject line “Artistic Director’s Assistant Application” before June 6th. Only applicants selected for an interview will be contacted.

20150819-9478

Summerfolk40 President’s Message

Presidents Message on the Anniversary Bash Summerfolk 40

Summerfolk 40 and the Anniversary Birthday Bash certainly exceeded all expectations in every sense of the word. It was a special weekend for everyone involved from young to old, festival patrons right on through to our volunteers.

A special thanks to James Keelaghan who did a superb job programming the festival this year. A special thanks to Roxanne Davidson, and her great team of Summerfolk Co-ordinators for transforming Kelso Beach into a place of pure magic. A special thanks to the army of volunteers who are the glue that hold us all together and allow each one of us the opportunity to truly experience something special. What a treat!!! What great memories!!!!

I was asked many times over the weekend what it was about Summerfolk weekend that continues to surprise and delight people. Simply put I believe it is the recognition and respect that our staff, our volunteers, performers, artisans and our community have for what Summerfolk has come to mean to them personally and to the fabric of this community. People really care about this event. I hear it every day when I am out and about.

Summerfolk will continue to endure and flourish because I am confident we all understand and appreciate that Summerfolk is a true gem, something extraordinary and that we are simply caretakers of something very special.

We are already hard at work planning for Summerfolk 2016 and beyond. We continue to need committed folks to step up and come on board to assist us with this work. I would love the opportunity to chat further with you about some specific opportunities right now. We need some folks to assist us with volunteer co-ordination and management, sponsorship and fundraising, marketing and promotion, and perhaps serving on or board. If you have an interest in any of the above areas, please get in touch with me through the office at 519-371-2995 or gbfs@bmts.com. Let’s get together for a coffee and a chat.

Keep an eye on summerfolk.org for more announcements that will soon be coming your way.
IMG_0146 crop
Phil Bye,
President
The Georgian Bay Folk Society

The View From Stage Right

newland
By David Newland

The other day, my teenage daughter confronted me: “Dad, why are you still wearing that t-shirt? It’s ten years old!” I looked down, stunned. “What?! This is my Summerfolk 30th anniversary shirt!” Okay, guilty as charged. But I can explain…

In 2004, I’d been playing as a singer-songwriter in Ontario for a couple of years. Festival gigs were hard to come by. I had played at a Last Chance Saloon for a slot at Summerfolk, and despite many a plastic beer cup raised to my effort, I didn’t get the gig.

 I did, however, get a chance to walk through the site at Kelso Park, where so many of my musical heroes had played. Walking among the standing stones with the winter wind whipping off Georgian Bay, I dedicated myself to someday playing Summerfolk.

 Elsewhere on the scene, fellow performers and volunteers talked of great moments spent at Summerfolk; of Willie P. Bennett and Stan Rogers; of passionate fans lined up to place their tarps; of late night jams, summer storms and endless encores; of a volunteer corps second to none.

 I got invited to play one of the off-season GBFS songwriter series shows, in a lovely theatre above the old courthouse. I stayed in a B&B with a basement vault, a relic of the Prohibition era whiskey trade. At the Tom Thomson gallery, I discovered the painter’s mandolin, a poignant artifact I have made a point of visiting time and again. If I couldn’t play the festival (yet) I could love and admire the place. And I did.

 When Liz Harvey-Foulds took over as AD in 2005, she hired some musical friends of mine, and one of them, Jory Nash, asked if I could help out as a volunteer stage host at the Homemade Jam stage. I jumped at the chance. You know the old saying: if you can’t dazzle them with brilliance, baffle them with… hosting. People I’d been listening to for years were playing: Tanglefoot, Rita Chiarelli, Garnet Rogers. I got to sit in on an Ian Tamblyn workshop! I was hooked.

 The following year I was back, hosting Down By the Bay. The dream was coming true by tiny increments. Prairie Oyster, Lynn Miles, Crooked Still… I was still a fan, but now I was finding myself backstage with these folks. On Sunday morning I caught the gospel workshop from my canoe, Suzie Vinnick’s voice echoing off the grain elevators.

 In 2009, with Richard Knechtel at the helm, I was back with my band, The McFlies. Rocking Down By the Bay, right before Hoots and Hellmouth on the Saturday night, was one of my favourite musical moments ever. The next day, Sharon, of Sharon, Lois & Bram showed up at a kids’ workshop I was hosting and joined me onstage for Skinnimarink. Does it get any better?

 It did. In 2011, Richard called again: how about hosting mainstage? Yes sir, I said. Summerfolk was one of seven festivals I did that year with my fiancée by my side, weeks before our wedding. Now I had someone to share all my favourite things with: the steam powered corn cooker, the deep fried turkey legs. The beach and the tipi and the smiling faces now becoming familiar: Pete Miller driving the shuttle van, Ariel Rogers managing the tweeners. Steve and Steve in the CIUT tent. The instrument petting zoo!

 In 2012, Summerfolk had a new Artistic Director, and I had a new album. James Keelaghan offered me a night hosting mainstage again, the usual workshop slots and a spot in a brand new venue: the Wine Bar. Now my wife was pregnant and the in-laws were along in support. Summerfolk had become a multi-generational affair in more ways than one: Nathan Rogers (with Dry Bones) took to the stage named after his father, just one among a slew of acts like Chic Gamine, Al Simmons, H’SAO, and my old buddy Dave Gunning. Wow.

 Two years later came another call from Keelo, this time with a bold request: would I host all three nights on main stage? On that long-ago winter’s day, all I’d hoped for was the chance to play the festival one day. And now I would be introducing the likes of Laura Cortese, Oh Suzannah, and the incredible Buffy Ste. Marie? Yes, I said. YES!

 And now here we are in 2015. Once again, I find myself heading to Owen Sound to host mainstage at Summerfolk. Now, it’s not just heroes, but colleagues and friends I have the honour of introducing: Up-and-comers, the Young Novelists. Ukulele wizard James Hill and the wildly talented Shari Ulrich. Samantha Martin, whose band will simply blow people away. The profound and insightful Evalyn Parry and the passionate and inspiring Digging Roots. The outlandish Steve Poltz and the haunting Sarah MacDougall. Joel Plaskett! Trout Fishing in America! Whitehorse!

 So yeah, I’m still wearing my volunteer t-shirt from 2005. It’s not yet holey, but it’s kinda… holy. Still, I may pick up a new one this year. Summerfolk 40? Sounds like a dream come true to me.

Fruitful artists have roots in tradition

Joel Plaskett

Joel Plaskett

By James Keelaghan

Several years ago, I was teaching at a music camp in New Jersey. I had a group of about 16 songwriters as students. On the first night they invited me down to a songwriters’ circle at one of the cabins. I went, stayed for one round through the circle, and said my “good nights”. I then went and played for two hours with the contra dance band.

The next day, they asked what I thought about the circle. My inner Canadian was still asleep and instead of being polite, I said what was on my mind. I told them that the best thing they could do as songwriters was to go back home and find a traditional band to play with-traditional Irish, traditional Rock and Roll, it didn’t matter. They were writing songs that had no tie to any tradition, except a singer songwriter tradition. To write better songs, they had to grow some roots. Case in point-Joel Plaskett.

Joel is a node. He’s one of these people who works well with others. He has written the occasional song with Matt Andersen. He produced the latest James Hill CD. He’s recorded and performed with Rose Cousins and Anne Egge. He’s played everything from orchestral shows to Cafes. Later this month, he’ll be performing as part of the Interstellar Allstars for the Interstellar Rodeo in Edmonton with Kathleen Edwards and Luke Doucet. He clearly likes to play. He likes to explore and bring people along for the ride.

Joel has spent most of his career in bands-Nabisco Fonzie, The Thrush Hermits, Neuseiland and his eponymous Joel Plaskett Emergency. Lately, he’s been appearing more as a solo or a duo. It allows him to be more nimble, to switch up the material. He’s a great live performer, relaxed and comfortable. His melodies are catchy. Though he has dabbled in a lot of styles musically, his lyrics maintain a consistent conversational tone. There’s a lot of storytelling.

Joel has enjoyed and is enjoying the kind of success that independent artists aspire to. Great sales, sold out concerts, nominations and awards are all fruits of hard work and talent. But there is something else.

Joel is, in fact, a poster child for the value of exposing kids to live music.

Before moving to Halifax, Joel grew up in Lunenburg Nova Scotia.The town is the embodiment, in wood and stone, of what every Canadian imagines Nova Scotia to be. Trim wooden houses rise up from the harbour. It looks prosperous because it was. The Bluenose is the most famous of the vessels that was built in that harbour, but she was only one of thousands born in Lunenburg’s cradles. In the mid 1800s, there could be as many as 18 vessels under construction at a time. There may be busloads of tourists now posing before the picturesque, but it’s still a working harbour.

Joel’s father, Bill Plaskett, is a musician in his own right. He was one of the founders of the Lunenburg Folk Harbour Festival. On festival weekend the town is dominated by the tent atop Blockhouse Hill, the highest point in town. Music also happens on the docks on the waterfront.

From the beginning, the festival was plagued by a lack of accommodation for the musicians. Volunteers and members of the board offered their houses as billets. Kitchen parties at the Plaskett house during the festival were a big event, but there was live music in the house all year round. Joel did not learn to be a musician in isolation, it was part of the fabric of his youth.

Evalyn Parry, who is going to be with us at Summerfolk this year, puts it this way

I was raised in a tradition: squeeze boxes in the kitchen.
Heads thrown back, call and response, feet stomping, gut strings thrumming.
Believing in the songs I was raised with .
Songs sung from festival stages, around campfires…
You can circumnavigate the globe in song, but you know you are home
When you know all the words

That’s why Nova Scotia, or Winnipeg, or the Ottawa Valley continue to produce consistently great musicians. There is a tradition of music being part of the everyday fabric of life.

That’s essentially what I was trying to say to that group of writers in New Jersey. They had some catching up to do. You don’t write good songs unless you come out of some sort of tradition. The more music you are exposed to in your youth, the better you will be. Luckily, it’s never too late to have a great childhood.

Joel Plaskett will be playing in the amphitheatre at Kelso Beach on Friday, August 21. He will do a workshop on Saturday Morning at 11AM with James Hill and Steve Poltz. They are just three of the over 40 acts that will be playing the Summerfolk Music and Crafts Festival August 20-23. Tickets and information can be found at summerfolk.org.

Putting the Crafts into Summerfolk Music and Crafts Festival

By Jon Farmer

When the first Summerfolk Music and Crafts Festival was held in 1976, organizers intended to promote folk music and folk arts. They filled the space between musical stages with crafts people demonstrating and selling their wares. The artisans didn’t have electrical access in 1976 and instead used candles and lanterns to light their booths at night. Forty years later, the Artisan Village is still a bright spot at the festival.

I discovered the magic of the Artisan Village one night at my first Summerfolk. I was heading back to the amphitheatre, following my new favourite artists between stages. Part way through the Artisan Village some acoustic music caught my attention. A group was jamming in a vendor tent ahead of me. I lingered at the entrance watching a handful of people in the dimly lit space, some sitting on the ground, some on chairs, all playing the handmade instruments from the displays. When the song ended someone greeted me and handed me a guitar that I couldn’t have afforded as a fifteen year old. I played Folsom Prison Blues and someone pulled a harmonica out of their pocket for a solo. I left the jamming artisans with a smile on my face.  I’ve forgotten whether that booth belonged to Ron Belanger or Outside Instruments, but both are returning for the 40th Anniversary Summerfolk.

Becoming a Summerfolk artisan is a competitive process. Aspiring crafts people apply through a discerning jury. The criteria are fixed: crafts must be handmade and of superb quality. After that, it’s anything goes. Seventy artisans applied to fill just 46 spaces. This year they’ll bring everything from hand forged metal and carved stone, to jewellery, clothing, instruments, and longboards. The juried process ensures a healthy mix of new and returning vendors. Each year 25-30% of the booths are new. Artisans are invited to submit their best works to the juried craft show over the weekend for the chance to win judges’, artisans’, and people’s choice awards.

Amanda Cuffe came to Summerfolk for the first time in 2014 with her Amanda Sew & Sooo booth, full of colourful handmade coats and sweaters. Amanda grew up surrounded by art in her grandfather’s Tobermory studio. Although she’s created art for her entire life, she only began to sew eight years ago when she inherited the contents of her aunt’s sewing room. She describes her sewing process like painting with big unrestricted strokes of colour. After a quick visit to her website, I she what she means. Her coats are colourful fabric collages that look decidedly spunky and warm. Amanda doesn’t use patterns. Every piece is truly one-of-a-kind. She made a good impression in 2014, winning the People’s Choice Award. She’s back for Summerfolk40.

Work by Amanda Sew & Sooo

Work by Amanda Sew & Sooo

Mark and Shelli Eisenberg brought their Delicate Touch Jewellery to Summerfolk for the first time in 1977 and have been back almost every year since. They use a soft saw technique to create beautifully intricate designs in gold and silver. If you’ve seen silver earrings shaped like the Georgian Bay Folk Society logo, then you know their work. Over their own 40 year career, Mark and Shelli have vended at hundreds of fairs and festivals but Summerfolk is their favourite. “We come back every year because we enjoy it and we do well,” Mark said on the phone from their studio in Hamilton. “It’s kind of like coming home”.

Summerfolk is a family affair for Mark and Shelli – in fact, their family started at the festival – and they brought their children every year after. One year the kids set up a face painting station to make a little money. “They ate like kings all weekend”, Mark said.

delicate touch

Rings by Delicate Touch Jewellery

Artisans camp behind their booths during Summerfolk, a tradition that helps the Artisan Village live up to its name. Richard Cox started to make wooden flutes a decade ago and has brought them to Summerfolk for almost as long. You’ll find him at his booth through the day, in the Down by the Bay tent enjoying the music at night, and cooking breakfast behind his booth in the early mornings.

Vince Bowen brought Rockrose Pottery to the festival in 1979 and hasn’t missed a year since. He’s known for fine porcelain ware with classic, simple forms, colourful glazes, and an eye for function. He has a history of winning the juried competition. Vince has shown his pottery at festivals across the country gathering a following of patrons, volunteers, and well-known musicians. Summerfolk is close to both his home and his heart.

Over the weekend, festival goers wander through the Artisan Village like treasure hunters. They chat with artisans, linger over pieces, and circle their favourites, deciding whether to carry them home. It’s not uncommon to see young and old walking the festival grounds showing off their newest souvenirs whether it’s one of Joel Brubacher’s Banjo Puppets or Lisa Spalding’s henna tattoos. The art, like the festival, is easy to get attached to.

You can find out more about all 46 of the artisans at www.summerfolk.org and meet them for yourself at the 40th anniversary Summerfolk Music and Crafts Festival at Kelso Beach in Owen Sound, August 21-23rd.

Trevor MacKenzie trying out a Rosbilt TinCan Banjo/Ukelele at Summerfolk39

Trevor MacKenzie trying out a Rosbilt TinCan Banjo/Ukelele at Summerfolk39

Q & A with the Wareham Forge

The Artisan Village puts the ‘Craft’ into the Summerfolk Music and Crafts Festival.  Recently, we asked Darrell Markewitz of the Wareham Forge about his over 20 years of Summerfolk experience.

At how many Summerfolks have you vended?

“Over 20”

I think my first year was either 1992 or 1993. I’ve missed two years over the period to this year.

How would you describe your experience at Summerfolk to another vendor who has never been?

The atmosphere at Summerfolk is far more relaxed than a typical ‘just sales’ event. There are a large number of people attending who come for all of the three days, plus a large number who actually camp on site for the whole event. This means a lot of ‘browsing’, people typically will make several returns to an individual booth, after viewing the entire selection of artistic work available, before making a purchase. This also goes for people who return year after year, watching your work as it develops. Generally I feel that although this does mean more effort on my part, it does make for a ‘better educated’ customer.

The very relaxed ‘old hippie’ tone to the event, coupled with this return flow, does mean that booth security has never, ever, been a concern for me personally. If you wander off yourself for a half hour (to see a music set), nothing will be missing and any potential customers know they can just catch you later.

Balanced against this are the length of the working days. Typically 12 plus hours – longer when you consider the set up Friday and tear down Sunday.

 How does Summerfolk compare to other craft and music festivals you attend?

Honestly, I have cut back on other sales events in the last decade.

Partially because of the huge work involved in transporting and setting up the booth structure. My own work has been come more complex over the decades – with an increase in pricing related to this quality and scale increase. I don’t make $20 candle holders any more, and consider my presentation at Summerfolk more of a gallery setting – than any specific attempt to generate sales. This year Summerfolk is the *only* retail sales event that I will be taking part in.

One significant part of Summerfolk is distinctive : the Artisan Gallery.

The original intent of this was to allow individual artists to display work well beyond the scope of typical sales items. Supporting this effort with cash prizes has proved especially effective in encouraging this additional effort to produce more elaborate objects by the artists.

(I’ve won a good number of these over the years, and personally I can tell you this recognition has been very important in personally encouraging my own work.)

What is your favourite Summerfolk memory?

For me it comes down to the people.

There are a group of regional artisans who over the years I have come to consider my peers. Many of these people I only see at Summerfolk, but even still there is a warmth of seeing ‘old friends’ every year.

This extends to the ‘customers’ as well. I do have some regulars who have in effect been ‘collecting’ my work over the years.

Personally, my many years beside Jim MacNamara has had a major impact on my direction of work and outlook to the ‘way of the artist’. Over the years, the line between our individual work has blurred, with echoes of the influence on each other (or at least Jim’s on me) showing. Not to mention general inspired craziness. At its height, the two us where actually showing up early Thursday morning and hauling in several tons of rock to create the large garden style displays which themselves became one of the many Summerfolk traditions.

What should people know about your art?

I am distinctive in the depth of historical research that goes behind the work people see displayed at Summerfolk. Since 2001, I have been involved in a series of experimental archaeology projects, recovering lost methods of actually smelting metallic iron from raw ores, based on Northern European ancient technologies. This makes Wareham the centre for this research, most certainly unique in Canada, and perhaps the primary site in all of North America.

The bloomery iron produced by these ancient methods is a distinctive material, with properties different than modern industrial steels. My effort to create objects revealing the forms and textures of bloomery iron will continue with new work presented at Summerfolk this year.

wareham forge

Visit the Wareham Forge online at http://www.warehamforge.ca/ and in person at Summerfolk40

Building on Musical Mentors

By James Keelaghan

In April this year, I lost a good friend. Ron Casat had been one of my earliest mentors. He taught me pretty well everything I know about music. He taught me how to be band leader and about the fundamentals of song writing and performance. He taught me the importance of musical community.

His memorial was held in Calgary on a bright May afternoon. Five or six hundred people attended to remember him and to play music. There were reggae bands, folkies, country singers, There were hundreds of people that he had played with over the years-hundreds who couldn’t make it. There were no “kinds” of music for Ron, there was just music. Ron built community and connected us all because he knew that was the only way for musicians to survive.

Most musicians have a “Ron” in their lives. I talked to Samantha Martin a couple of days ago and I wanted to know who were the influences on her musically. I wanted to know if there was something special about the Grey Bruce in her musical development. Sam was born in Edmonton, but her dad’s family have been on the peninsula for 4 or 5 generations. At various stages in her life, she found herself living by the shores of Georgian Bay. She says there is a special community vibe here, a feeling that’s hard to find in other places.

Samantha Martin and Delta Sugar

Samantha Martin and Delta Sugar

Her voice is always true. True enough that she could belt out show tunes when she was in elementary school. Like most great musicians she plowed through a lot of different styles before finding the music that speaks to their heart.

Eventually she spent a lot of time hanging out at the intersection of gospel, blues, rockabilly and soul music.

2015 may be her biggest year yet. She was featured in the prestigious Women Blues Revue concert at Massey hall in Toronto last November. She’s in demand at festivals in Canada and Europe. The critics have been universal in praising her power and originality.

Who was her Ron? Without hesitation, Samantha answered that it was Trevor and Tara MacKenzie.

When Martin came back to town in 2004 after time away at college, it was Trevor and Tara that helped her focus on what she wanted and how to get it. They encouraged her to write and helped her join what was in her head with what was in her heart.  She recorded her first EP at Trevor’s studio. She’s hardly looked back, except in gratitude.

Musicians are like sharks. In order to live you have to keep moving. You have to try to carry your music to its farthest geographical limit. But in doing that, it’s easy to lose home and community.

When Tara MacKenzie came back to the Grey Bruce after being away for the better part of her 20’s, it was only for a family visit. She had been playing and studying in Amsterdam, Budapest and throughout Europe.

On that trip back, she met Trevor MacKenzie. In Trevor, she found someone who shared her passion for building musical community. She did what is hard for a lot of touring musicians to do. She put down roots.

You can see Trevor and Tara’s contribution to the musical community everywhere you look. It’s  can be seen in The Choir that Rocks, the constant recording sessions at Trev’s studio, their participation in the Youth Discoveries program. They’ve provided hands on education and vocal training and many more initiatives.

In the past 3 or 4 years, though, the road has been calling again. The MacKenzie Blues Band has been wandering farther from home. They have a full slate of festivals this summer. If you don’t know them from here in town, you haven’t been paying attention. As blues outfits go, there are few as tight or as powerful as MBB. Trevor is a truly awesome electric guitar player. At Summerfolk three years ago, no less than Oscar Lopez, threatened to steal him away. Trev declined. With a rhythm section anchored by Mike weir on Drums and Joel Dawson on bass, the Mackenzie Blues Band make a mighty sound.

 

The MacKenzie Blues Band

The MacKenzie Blues Band

The beating heart of the band is undoubtebly Tara MacKenzie. She gives the band a run for its money in the power department with a voice that will literally blow your hair back. As a vocalist she does more than blues, though. If you haven’t heard her sing Irish Traditional music you haven’t lived.

No matter how much they tour, though, there is no way that they will abandon the scene they have helped to build.

Summerfolk survives because of the community that has been built over 40 years, by the work that is done every year by over 700 volunteers, by the kind contribution of sponsors. It also thrives because there is a vibrant musical scene in the Grey Bruce that gets better with every passing year.

Samantha Martin and Delta Sugar, The MacKenzie Blues band and over 40 other acts will be building a community by the shores of Georgian Bay at the Summerfolk Music and Crafts Festival this year. Summerfolk gets underway with a 40th Birthday bash on Thursday, August 20 and continues for three days of music, art and food August 21-23 at Kelso Beach Park. Information can be found at summerfolk.org or by calling 519-371-2995

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trout Fishing in America

Trout Fishing in America

By James Keelaghan
Nineteen eighty-eight was the first year I played Summerfolk with my own band. The festival, as usual, supplied rooms to out of town performers. Our rooms were on the ground floor of the hotel. My mandolin player, Kathy Cook, shared a hotel room with a young up and coming songwriter named Shaun Colvin. I shared a room with my curmudgeonly bass player, Bill Eaglesham.

On the Friday night, at the hotel, the party spilled out of the function room and into the hallway. People would emerge from rooms with mandolins, guitars or banjos and disappear into one of the many jam sessions going on. At the far end of the hall, a door opened and a man stepped into the hall. You couldn’t miss him. He was 6’8 with broad shoulders. He seemed to fill the hallway. Behind him, a more diminutive man was negotiating the passage with an upright bass. That was my first glimpse of Keith Grimwood and Ezra Idlet, better known as Trout Fishing in America.

I got to see them in action that night and they were the life of the party. Over the course of the weekend, I caught them as many times as I could. I came to realize they are that most essential of festival elements-the spark plug. They are musical instigators. They are also so proficient, and so sensitive, that they can play with anyone. Ezra and Keith manage to put other performers at ease and get them playing with one another.

Their personalities are as different as their heights. Ezra is more playful and extroverted while Keith is more serious and reserved. The difference is what makes them so strong. They bring out the best in one another.

Keith began playing music professionally when he was still in his teens. He was part of the Texas All-State Orchestra for years and later earned a degree in music from the University of Houston. At 22, he landed a position with the Houston Symphony Orchestra. Keith put himself through college with the inevitable basketball scholarship and by playing pop music in local clubs.

Idlet and Grimwood met  in 1976 when they became members of the eclectic folk/rock band, St. Elmo’s Fire. When St. Elmo’s dissolved in 1979, Trout Fishing in America was born (named for Keith’s love of Richard Brautigan’s writing and Ezra’s love of fishing).

I have rarely met two musicians more accomplished than Keith and Ezra. There are many reasons that they have been doing this for almost 40 years-solid rhythms, blazing riffs and great writers who also know how to cover other people’s material. Add to that four grammy nominations and an upright bass full of other awards and you get the idea. It’s only fitting that they join us for our 40th on the eve of their 40th. They are also one of the most requested acts from Summerfolk fans.

It’s rare to have a band that has seen you through a couple of decades of your life. The other day I pulled up a list of performers from that year. Of the 13 duos or bands at the 1988 festival, there are two still in existence. Trout Fishing in America is one of them.

One of the great things about Trout Fishing, from an artistic director’s perspective, is you get two bands in one. There is no denying their appeal to the adults, but Keith and Ezra discovered early on that they also were kid magnets. There are very few artists that can pull that off. Usually one or the other suffers. That’s why they will not only headline our mainstage, but will also be the highlight of our Family programme.

Summerfolk has always been a family affair. In fact, some families are represented by three generations at Summerfolk. We’ve expanded the family programme and made it easier on the family pocket book this year by making admission free for children 12 and under accompanied by a ticketed adult.

This year our children’s area will feature, the massive craft tent, Todd’s musical petting zoo, a Sunday afternoon children’s parade, and a return of Elephant Thoughts with reptile displays, Science gizmos and gadgets, a bubble station and more.

Our children’s parade was one of the highlights for the festival in 2014 and it’ll be even better this year. Stilt walkers, costumes, a 30 foot articulated dragon decorated by the kids and a parade route that takes them through the park and to the opening of the evening concert.

This year, we will also be having a children’s open stage session in the gazebo tent. It’s a chance for the youngsters to strut their stuff.

Trout Fishing will be doing workshops all weekend at the 40th Annual Summerfolk Music and Crafts Festival and will headline the amphitheatre stage on Saturday Aug. 22. Their featured kid’s show will be that same Saturday afternoon. Summerfolk happens at Kelso Beach Park Aug 20-23. All the information you need, and links to tickets can be found at summerfolk.org or by phoning 519-371-2995.

Thanks to Karen Kuczeryk-Uyede for the photo

In the Spirit of Camping

If we were going to explain the spirit of Summerfolk in one sentence it would look something like this: “People gathering outside to share music and art”.  Visitors find folks doing just that at every one of the seven stages on the festival site, along the paths in the artisan village, and in the campgrounds beside the festival. You find it again just to the north when volunteers transform a soccer field into a friendly village of tents and trailers where flashlights and torches cast shadows on old and new friends telling stories and sharing songs.  Across the road at the municipal Kelso Beach Campground, festival goers arrange tarps, tents, and trailers into homes away from home complete with sing-a-longs and decades’ worth of Summerfolk stories.

The spirit of Summerfolk follows the people, moving east to the festival grounds in the day and back to the Kelso Beach Campground when the stages shut down. Musicians and music lovers flock like moths, drawn by the light of bonfires and familiar choruses. Generations of festival goers teach each other songs, pass drinks in thanks, and share stories about their favourite performances from the day.  Strangers have been known to pass instruments freely, trade solo’s spontaneously, and send multi-part harmonies drifting up with the smoke towards the stars. There are few places in the world where people who don’t yet know one another’s names can jam and laugh so freely. Sometimes festival performers even drift over with guitars, double basses, and noisemakers from around the world. After all, they’re musicians because they love the music. It’s all part of the spirit that has brought people back to Summerfolk for four decades.

We’re expecting a big crowd for Summerfolk 40 and the City of Owen Sound made 40 additional campsites available at Kelso Beach so that even more campers can share the spirit. If you don’t manage to secure a spot at Kelso Beach, don’t worry. There are other campgrounds in the area. The Harrison Park Campground is only four kilometres to the south (that’s a 7 minute drive or  – if you’re not in a rush and prefer to cycle – a 14 minute ride on your bike. Private camping is also available in the surrounding area at Whispering Pines and the local KOA campground (both good options for motor-homes and trailers).

Thanks to Karen Kuczeryk-Uyede for the photo

Photo Credit: Karen Kuczeryk-Uyede

 

 

General Information 2015

GATES OPEN:

Thursday ~ 7pm – music from 8 – 11pm

Friday ~ 4:30 pm – music from 6pm – 1 am

Saturday ~ 10:30 am – music from 11:00am – 1:00 am

Sunday ~ 10:00 am – music from 10:30 am – 11:00 pm

 

TICKETS:   Tickets are non-refundable. The festival goes on rain or shine.  Tickets can be purchased in advance through Ticketpro by calling 1-888-655-9090 or online at www.summerfolk.org or by contacting the GBFS office in person or by calling 519-371-2995.  The on-site ticket booth will open starting at 7:00 pm on the Thursday and at 4:30pm on the Friday of the festival.

Tickets for evening concerts Friday, Saturday, and Sunday go on sale at 8:00 pm on the evening of the concert; only if there is space available.  There are no advance sales on evening concert tickets. 

WHAT TO BRING:  Suitable clothing for a range of temperatures.  Temperatures range from hot August days to cool and cold nights.  Definitely bring rain gear, as umbrellas are not permitted in the Amphitheatre because they block the view of other patrons.  You may bring your own food; there are picnic tables throughout the park. There is an extensive food court with over a dozen food vendors offering a variety of food options vegetarian.

ENTERING THE SITE:  Volunteers from the Security and Front Gate crews are present to ensure an easy and safe entrance for everyone.  Line ups form early.  The gate line up will be 2 people wide.  For those who wish to go directly to the Amphitheatre when the gate opens to set up seating for the evening concerts, groups of 30 patrons at a time will be escorted to the entrance of the theatre.  There will be no running.  Runners will be escorted to the end of the line.  Patrons are asked to remain at their selected seat in the Amphitheatre until the opening line has cleared.

AMPHITHEATRE SEATING POLICY:  One person can save seating space for a maximum of 4 people in the Amphitheatre.  Lawn chairs are permitted but must be single seat, standard size only.  No gravity chairs, high backs, combination cooler/chairs, chairs with extending foot rests, leg rests or canopies allowed. Tarps 5’ x 7’ may be used to save up to 4 spaces, however, in the tiered section they must be confined to one level.  Aisles in the Amphitheatre must be kept clear of chairs; coolers and bags must be stored under chairs.

SPECIAL NEEDS:  There is a designated wheelchair and special needs seating area at the north-east side of the Amphitheatre stage right.  There are 10 ‘Handicapped’ parking spaces beside the main front gate entrance.  You must have a government issued permit displayed on the vehicle in order to use these spaces.  Individuals who do not have a parking permit may drop off their passengers at the main gate and then find a parking spot.  There are paved pathways in the park, as well as gravel and grass paths.  The paved pathways reach to the Food Court, Artisans Village, the licensed area and Amphitheatre stage.  There is a grass pathway from the licensed stage area to the General Store and First Nations Village.  Stages are not signed but we offer several Braille programs.  There are wheelchair accessible Port-a-potties located throughout the park.

ALCOHOL AND DRUGS: Festival goers are prohibited from bringing alcohol or drugs onto the festival site.  Festival Security has the right to search containers and confiscate any prohibited materials.  There are licensed areas on site.

PETS: Not allowed on the site with the exception of service animals which must be properly harnessed.

BICYCLES: We provide a secure bicycle corral however bikes are not permitted onto the festival site.  Bile racks are provided at all gates.

SMOKING: There is no smoking in the Amphitheatre during concerts, in the Children’s Area and in the Cafe of the Senses.  The entire licensed (Down By the Bay tent and Backstage Bar) areas are smoke free as well.

LOST KIDS/PARENTS: Children may be registered free of charge at the First Aid Trailer.  Children and adults will have a corresponding number written on their wristbands.  If there was no admission charge for a child, a wristband will be given at the time.  If a child is lost, Security crews are notified and a volunteer will stay with the child and take them to the First Aid/Lost Kids area.  The identification number only will be broadcast from the stages to inform the adults.  If the child has not been registered, the proper identification will be required to the satisfaction of volunteer security or a police officer before the child is released to any adult.  We do not offer babysitting services and children are not permitted to be left alone while participating in Children’s village activities.

CAMPING: There is no camping on site (except for volunteers).  There is a City run campground across the street from the site at the Kelso Beach Campground.  This site is not recommended for families.

         The Harrison Park campground opens for reservations on May 1st and the Kelso Beach Campground opens May 11th.

*****Mark that day on your calendar!!****

Campers are not permitted to bring their own firewood into the campground in an attempt to prevent the spread of invasive insects.  The 2015 rate for camping at Kelso Beach is $30.00/night. Camping is also available at Harrison Park or the KOA Campground and Whispering Pines campgrounds further from the Summerfolk site.
The campgrounds take reservations.

                   Kelso Park and Harrison Park: 519-371-9734       email: www.tourism.owensound.ca

                   KOA Campground: 519-371-1331

Whispering Pines: 519-371-9833

 

ACCOMODATIONS: There are no accommodations within easy walking distance.  All accommodations fill up very early for Summerfolk weekend and it is recommended that people reserve their accommodations first – it can always be cancelled later.  There are an array of hotel/motel/bed and breakfast available throughout the City and surrounding area ranging from inexpensive to luxury.

Contact the Owen sound tourism office for details.

Owen Sound Tourism office: 1-888-675-5555 / 519-371-9833 or          www.vacation@e-owensound.com

Grey Bruce escapes  website; under accommodations

 

PARKING: The curb lanes of the main road servicing the park are designated for parking free of charge.

There is also free parking on the residential streets surrounding the park.

                    Please respect the residents and neighbourhood.                

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